IAM Cycling

Plax

Veteran
Location
Wales
does anyone know about this?
http://www.iam.org.uk/iamcyclingmembership.html

Just noticed it now after reading the results of the IAM Poll of cyclists;
http://www.iam.org.uk/latest_news/cycletrainingmoreimportantthanhelmetssaysiampoll.html

They offer;
For only £15, IAM Cycling Members receive a fantastic pack of benefits worth £40, including:

  • “How to be a better cyclist” book (normally £9.99)
  • IAM “Total Cycle Assist” policy**, looking after you and your bike whilst on the road and in the event of an incident (normally £12).
  • 10% discount vouchers for Halfords.
  • Hi-viz draw string bag (normally £9).
I'd be interested to know what their book says, and how it compares to Cyclecraft, but I'm too tight to fork out £15.
 

wesa

Well-Known Member
Location
Oxfordshire
The e-Shop describes the book as:
Whether you are relatively new to cycling, someone returning to the activity or you have many years experience, you will find enormous value in this book. It will help to take your cycling to a whole new level.

“How to be a better cyclist” is a comprehensive guide to becoming a better cyclist. It can be used for personal study or in conjunction with training to the National Cycle Training standard. It delivers all the information you need to become an advanced cyclist, in a logical and accessible way and also includes information on riding with children.


I remember reading about this in one of the recent IAM Magazines. IIRC the book is based on cyclecraft but applies the IAM principles (observation and the system of 'car' control) to cycling. I will see if I can find the article.

When I read the article I was interested but I forgot about it until now.
 

dondare

Über Member
Location
London
Plax said:
They offer;
For only £15, IAM Cycling Members receive a fantastic pack of benefits worth £40, including:

  • “How to be a better cyclist” book (normally £9.99)
  • IAM “Total Cycle Assist” policy**, looking after you and your bike whilst on the road and in the event of an incident (normally £12).
  • 10% discount vouchers for Halfords.
  • Hi-viz draw string bag (normally £9).
Is it aimed at the under-12s?
 
OP
Plax

Plax

Veteran
Location
Wales
dondare said:
Is it aimed at the under-12s?
:wacko:. It would be interesting to know if there is any uptake on it. I've personally not seen any advertising targetted at me as a cyclist, and with it being an organisation originally set up for the motorised audience my bet is most of them won't bother with it.

Judging by some of the answers given to the poll also, my money is on it being a completely different kettle of fish if the "non IAM members" results were removed (the majority of which was cyclists I'd bet).
Notes to Editors:

  • Attached: IAM member, non-IAM member and IAM associate member splits.
  • When asked what was the most important consideration to help cyclists in the UK: 21.49 per cent suggested further introduction and enforcement of 20 mph zones (6.8 per cent of members, 24.79 per cent of non-members). 30.1% suggested further introduction of physically separate cycle lanes (33.87 per cent of members, 29.28 per cent non-members).
  • 40.24 per cent thought additional police resources should be made available to ensure cyclists adhere to the rules of the road (65.7 per cent of members, 35.25 per cent of non-members).
  • 82.46 per cent thought the introduction of a licence or registration process for cyclists was a bad idea. (53.82 per cent of members, 88.23 per cent of non-members).
 
Actually the IAM is fairly sensible and supportive when it comes to cycling.

Their "Sharing the Road with Cyclists" FactSheet is in the main sensible and coherent:

Institute of Advanced Motorists 510 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 5RG Telephone: 020 8996 9600, Fax 020 8996 9601 Fact Sheet 17/001 SHARING THE ROAD WITH CYCLISTS

Cyclists all travel at different speeds and have different levels of road experience. As a driver, you will need to take care to judge their speed as well as the road and weather conditions from the cyclist's point of view. Remember too that some cyclists, particularly younger ones, have never driven a car, and so don't recognise the problems that they can cause car drivers. In an accident involving a car and a cyclist, whoever is to blame the cyclist will always be the more vulnerable to a serious injury.

The following tips for motorists have been prepared with the National Cycling Strategy Board to avoid adding to the 2,500 cyclists killed or seriously injured each year. Cyclists don't have steel armour round them like we do. Passing them at speed within a foot of their elbow may feel perfectly safe from where you are, but it is very disconcerting when you are the cyclist.

Sounding your horn when you are close will startle them, maybe into swerving in front of you. They will usually be aware of you already! Slow down around cyclists and drive smoothly. Keep within the speed limit.

In traffic, make sure that you don't cut up a cyclist who is about to pass you on the near side.

Don't try to cut across a cyclist when you need to turn left at a junction. Wait behind the cyclist until the cyclist has either turned left or passed the junction.

Park with care and prevent any passengers from opening a door until you are sure that there is no cyclist coming up on either side. Likewise, check over your shoulder to see there's no cyclist approaching before opening the driver's door.

Cyclists are advised to take a prominent position in the road well ahead of any manoeuvre to ensure they are in the right place at the right time. If they ride in the middle of the road it is probably not to obstruct your path, but to ensure that they are seen by you and by other motorists.

Cyclists often ride at some distance from the kerb to avoid drains and potholes and to discourage motorists from squeezing them on narrow roads. It is not in their interest to delay motorists deliberately. Remember too that their ability to signal is limited compared to ours, so try to anticipate what they might do from the position they have taken on the road. Please be patient.

Advanced stop lines are for cyclists alone and should be respected, so leave the space between the two sets of stop lines empty, whether or not cyclists are occupying it when you arrive. Be aware of where cycle lanes terminate, because this often means road space is more scarce and that in turn can make a cyclist more vulnerable.

Give young riders even more space than older ones; both old and young riders may swerve suddenly to avoid debris or potholes, but young people are more prone to forget your presence when they do.

Remember to use all your mirrors with extra care before changing direction when there are cyclists about. There might be a cyclist in your blind spot. Pay particular attention on roundabouts, as many accidents to cyclists happen at these junctions. Always signal at roundabouts.

Finally, every motorist has seen some irresponsible cyclists use the pavement, road and zebra crossings, seemingly at random. This is not only dangerous for pedestrians but unlawful, and the police can and do issue penalty notices for such offences. The police take a serious view of such careless or dangerous cycling, particularly when it puts other road users at risk. Responsible motorists give such irresponsible cyclists a wide berth.

For information on any other aspect of driving or riding please contact the IAM on 020 8996 9600 or visit iam.org.uk
Now if only they had included pavement drivers in the last paragraph!
 

wesa

Well-Known Member
Location
Oxfordshire
I have contacted the IAM Cycling team to ask for more info on this. I was quite disappointed at how little information I could find on the IAM web site.

I will post here if I get any info.
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
I did my IAM training and even took a trial for the test. After 10 minutes the bloke told me that although my technique was excellent I would never pass the test because I wasn't driving to "The System". So I gave it up. Been driving 37 years and still haven't had an accident (fingers crossed). I think 12 years of motorcycling helps with safe car driving too.
 

yello

Legendary Member
This bit from the IAM factsheet made me smile...

Slow down around cyclists and drive smoothly. Keep within the speed limit.
You mean, they weren't within the speed limit already?? :sad::sun:

I support any organisation that's going to get a 'safe cycling' message out there. That is, of course, if what they say does promote safety - but I have no reason to expect the IAM to be paying lip service here. They are, generally speaking, a sensible organisation with fewer go-faster stripes than Rospa (imho of course). Plus, given the vast majority of the current membership are car drivers, I consider this a very positive move - since a 'safe cycling' message requires motorists to play their part.

So, yes, this looks like a interesting membership deal to me. I'd be particularly interested to know the details of the 'Total Cycle Assist' policy (no use to me personally but it never-the-less interests me!) as I do think this is something lacking (or very expensive) in CTC, LCC, BC etc memberships.
 
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