Jenny Graham - Around The World Record

cisamcgu

Legendary Member
Location
Merseyside-ish
Hugely optimistic plan, I would think - self supported, 16 hours per day, 180 miles per day.

But, good luck to her :smile:
 

Aravis

Here for the ride.
Location
Gloucester
Can someone help me - what's the best way of keeping track of this?

From the link above, this table seems to imply that so far she's up with the 16 hours a day, 180 miles a day schedule:

Graham.JPG


But a moving average speed of 13.8 mph would give about 660 miles.

I can find her on Strava but there don't seem to be any updates since she started.

Surely she's not expecting to keep to the schedule every day, and will be eating into the 34 days' contingency quite a bit?
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I wonder if the tracker does a series of point to points, each time losing a short distance due to bends in the road.

Presumably, the distance isn't so important, the idea being to get back to the start point in as short a time as possible.

The round the world record has never gripped me, I suspect because there's too many transfers across oceans.

Unavoidable, but it does turn any attempt into a short series of long rides which I don't find very involving.
 

Aravis

Here for the ride.
Location
Gloucester
I wonder if the tracker does a series of point to points, each time losing a short distance due to bends in the road.

Presumably, the distance isn't so important, the idea being to get back to the start point in as short a time as possible.

The round the world record has never gripped me, I suspect because there's too many transfers across oceans.

Unavoidable, but it does turn any attempt into a short series of long rides which I don't find very involving.
Yes, I get that. It becomes quite an articifial concept, especially with the sections across Australia and New Zealand.

Another take on "Around the World" would be overland from the Cape of Good Hope to Cape Horn. Is that a recognised challenge? It would certainly be unambiguous, in the same way as LEJOG is. If only I'd thought of it 30 years ago. ;)
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
Yes, I get that. It becomes quite an articifial concept, especially with the sections across Australia and New Zealand.

Another take on "Around the World" would be overland from the Cape of Good Hope to Cape Horn. Is that a recognised challenge? It would certainly be unambiguous, in the same way as LEJOG is. If only I'd thought of it 30 years ago. ;)
Isn't the Atlantic Ocean in the way ...? :whistle:
 

Aravis

Here for the ride.
Location
Gloucester
Isn't the Atlantic Ocean in the way ...? :whistle:
No.
 

Aravis

Here for the ride.
Location
Gloucester
No big deal, just another way of looking at things.

The conventional round the world route, if it exists, is a piecemeal collection of routes across continents separated by ocean crossings. The longest continuous journey on the globe which can't be shortened is from the Cape of Good Hope to the far west of Siberia. In second place is the journey from Alaska to Cape Horn. They're separated by a narrow straight, giving a single mega-route requiring no ocean crossing. I think that looks a more satisfactory version of around the world that what's usually done. You could "complete" it by crossing the Atlantic if you wish.

It also looks a lot more difficult than the one that's usually done, so you'd've thought someone would want to try it...
 

T4tomo

Guru
do you just get up some speed and bunny hop the narrow straight then, as last time I looked there was a gap between Siberia and Alaska?
 

T4tomo

Guru
Yes, I get that. It becomes quite an articifial concept, especially with the sections across Australia and New Zealand.
The route also seems to hit Alaska half way across, presumably as the far western bit is too difficult to either access or cycle over?
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
The Guiness rules for this are many and complex I would think. Fortunately, Jenny has the right team to fine tune and check all this before she set off.
 
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