Kona stinky downhill advice

PJ79LIZARD

Über Member
Location
WEST MIDLANDS
Hi i'm interested in buying a second hand kona stinky downhill, I've seen one for 600 hundred is this a fair price?

are these top not mtb's as I'm mainly a road bike user but have dabbled in mountain biking and want to get a better bike, one that's going to last if I get more serious,

Any input would be great thanks!
 
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PJ79LIZARD

PJ79LIZARD

Über Member
Location
WEST MIDLANDS
That should say 'are these top notch mtb's'
 
Unless you're thinking of riding mainly downhill trails I wouldn't get a kona stinky for general mtb use. They are great bikes and well built, but all that downhill suspension and additional frame mass is going to be a pain when pedaling on the flat and up hill. You can stiffen the suspension, making the bike more efficient for pedaling, but that sort of negates getting such a long travel bike in the first place. Saying all that, I ride a 6” travel bike almost all the time and love it. Being able to ride over almost anything is kind of fun, but my frame doesn't have the same slack geometry as a downhill bike and pedals well.

You don’t mention the age and condition of the bike, but for that price I’d be looking for a 2008, maybe 2007 model in good condition. Maybe a few signs of wear and tear, couple of scratches. Wheels need to be true, hubs tight, suspension should have been serviced at least once since new, no give in the headset, possibly a new chain and cassette. If this downhill bike had been ridden as intended as a downhill bike you’ll need to double check shocks for blown seals, rims for dents, disc brake pad wear and the frame itself for cracks. Look around the areas where seat post and top tube connect and the headset for small hairline cracks. A quick an easy test is hold the bike up, balanced on its back wheel and bounce it. A good bike doesn’t rattle.

As well as considering frame size you may need to check the coil fitted to the shock is correct for your weight. They’re pretty cheap, but something additional to add to your budget.
 
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PJ79LIZARD

PJ79LIZARD

Über Member
Location
WEST MIDLANDS
Thanks for the great advice, it's a 15 inch frame I'm not sure what that mens I'm used to 54cm on my roadies, I'm 5'11"
I didn't realise the downhill bikes were heavier, I'm used to light road bikes, what sort of weight would these be are the frames aluminium?
The bikes only been used on the road never off road so is in mint condition, I need to confirm the age.
 
Thanks for the great advice, it's a 15 inch frame I'm not sure what that mens I'm used to 54cm on my roadies, I'm 5'11"
I didn't realise the downhill bikes were heavier, I'm used to light road bikes, what sort of weight would these be are the frames aluminium?
The bikes only been used on the road never off road so is in mint condition, I need to confirm the age.
Anything less than 35lbs is considered light for a downhill bike. Some run to +40lbs which can be quite a heft compared to your road bike.

And for your height I would have said a 15" frame was a bit small. You can stick on a longer seat post and longer stem to make it fit, but the bike could end up feeling a bit cramped.
 
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PJ79LIZARD

PJ79LIZARD

Über Member
Location
WEST MIDLANDS
I've looked into frame sizes and your right I need to be lookin for a 19 inch frame I think, better keep lookin! Might look at hardtail versions if there lighter, thanks for your input.
 

Waspie

Über Member
Location
East Lothian
I've looked into frame sizes and your right I need to be lookin for a 19 inch frame I think, better keep lookin! Might look at hardtail versions if there lighter, thanks for your input.
An 18 inch frame could well be a better fit than a 19.

Hardtails are generally lighter, but don't rule out a full suss, there are plenty that are good for more all round mountain biking compared to the Kona Stinky.
 

billflat12

Über Member
Location
cheshire
I have had a few road bikes, cyclocross, hybrids over the years , I have also demo,d a few modern all-mountain bikes but find they are only a compromise for the type of riding i do mostly , ( i would consider a santacruz nomad if it was in my budget) But having owned a stinky since 2006 , i will say the stinky is very sturdy & climbs fine with the rear shock & pro pedal set up correctly, my model has the 17cm triple clamp fork up front (No Steering flex on rough technical trails) + i can honestly say i dont have to worry about a bad line wherever i point it, I do tend to use my zasker hardtail with a 140cm single crown fork for singletrack trails, mainly because its faster, but for pure fun when the mood takes me i wheel my stinky out every time. If your new to MTB i would advise you buy a quality hardtail before buying a full suspension mainly because you get more of a feel for a bikes handling over rough/loose terrain.
 

ChrisBD

New Member
I think most of your Q's have been answered; but, as a multi-Kons owner I'll add my two-pennieth worth.

With a Kona, at your hight (as mine) you'll want their 18in frame; stick with a hard tail and on that budget (simiral to the secong hand Stinky ((great bike BTW)) you could fing a new Cinder Cone, or depending on exact spec you may even be able to find a 2009 model Caldera........ both are great bikes for the money.
 
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