Lack of cycling - back pain has come back.

Globalti

Legendary Member
Haven't been out on the bike for a couple of weeks now and it's amazing how quickly the pain in the small of the back has returned as the muscles become weaker. Having had a cold and spent a lot of time slouched on a badly-shaped sofa won't have helped either.

During normal times the muscle tone in the lumbar area is good enough to protect my back. I guess I could do some exerises or, perish the thought, get the turbo out....
 

screenman

Legendary Member
Do you stretch on the days you are off of the bike? I find this helps a lot, since I lost the weight though back has not been a problem.
 

craigwend

Grimpeur des terrains plats
I also find this & even 'thought' about getting the turbo out - having had a rubbish amount of rides this month,
I also find any significant 'lay in' makes it worse - think I've been programmed to work hours :eek:
 

2clepto

Guest
Haven't been out on the bike for a couple of weeks now and it's amazing how quickly the pain in the small of the back has returned as the muscles become weaker. Having had a cold and spent a lot of time slouched on a badly-shaped sofa won't have helped either.

During normal times the muscle tone in the lumbar area is good enough to protect my back. I guess I could do some exerises or, perish the thought, get the turbo out....

the back problems you describe are so similar to my symptoms when i injured my back i thought id share what i found in recovery.

i hurt my back around 8 years ago and couldnt move for three weeks (a very bad idea, always keep moving through the pain the body responds very well to movement), use hiking sticks around the house to assist with the moving when in acute pain, theyre so helpful when one needs a poo lol.

i dumped my car the seat was awful and so was using the clutch in traffic, i changed my sofa and bed. all the beds designed to help back pain are rubbish and ludicrously expensive, i got a super mattress from ikea for 500 pound and it still functions great, also turn the mattress over every few months to avoid sleeping in a dip. also splash out and buy new pillows and while in acute pain get new pillows every 12 weeks, good sleep is vital when in recovery.

i tried chiropractors who i found to be charlatans, physio's who i found much better but too busy too expensive and i needed constant recovery not a messily 45 mins per week, yoga the most successful, but only basic yoga none of the technical stuff, just using yoga to get oxygen to my muscles which is what people in back pain need more than anything imo. i also read a bit about the alexander technique which redirects the person in pain to move in a pain preventative way.

i also bought some decent hiking boots (anton) and wear them all the time, they make your feet sweat but the ankle support is fantastic when one considers the ankles support the rest of the structure, and if the ankles are in line and supported when moving injuries are avoided.

finally, avoid stretching unless the muscles are warmed up.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
Whilst certainly it is not a good idea to stretch cold, it is a very good idea to stretch daily. A lot of problems are caused by weak and tight muscles.

With your boot idea, I think it has been shown that wearing support can weaken a muscle, I will look into that further.
 

JtB

Black Lives Matter
Location
North Hampshire
Haven'tbeen out on the bike for a couple of weeks now and it's amazing how quickly the pain in the small of the back has returned as the muscles become weaker. Having had a cold and spent a lot of time slouched on a badly-shaped sofa won't have helped either.

During normal times the muscle tone in the lumbar area is good enough to protect my back. I guess I could do some exerises or, perish the thought, get the turbo out....
I have the same problem and so had a CT scan to get to the bottom of it. Turns out I have a degenerative condition called Facet Joint Syndrome (general wear and tear). So I've now got exercises to do 3 nights a week to strengthen the core. So far so good.
 

Joshua Plumtree

Approaching perfection from a distance.
Unless you have an underlying medical problem, then I would suggest, legs raises, sit-ups, crunches, planks, press-ups and stretches. But not necessarily in that order! :rolleyes:

Might not be the same for everyone, but I find that most of my back problems disappear if I maintain strong stomach muscles.
 
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