Lazzaretti for beginners

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
That's a really pretty bike! I'm not sure what second hand bike prices are like in your neck of the woods - in the UK they've gone a bit mental with the various lockdowns, so you'd need to perhaps see what other bikes are priced like in your area. I don't think for a vintage bike in the condition it looks to be in that it's particularly overpriced though.

I really like vintage steel, nothing rides quite like it. That bike has had some modernisation in terms of components and looks like it's been very well maintained. If you go to look at it, pay attention to the welds and where the bridges on the rear triangle are for cracks in the paint/metal (one where the rear brake sits and one behind the cranks in front of the wheel) as these are two of the likeliest places that an older frame will fail.
 

alicat

Legendary Member
Location
Staffs
I'm no expert but it could be quite a lively* ride especially if you are new to cycling. Can you try it before you buy it? If it does prove to be the case, sell it on and get something with a longer wheelbase.

*by lively, I mean that when you turn the bars the bike turns more than you are expecting so you don't relax and you can feel like you are going to fall. Good for speed when you are experienced and less good when you are new/tired/gone further than you are used to.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
That’s a very nice bike. It’s been tastefully and considerately updated ( originally 6 speed). Modern wheels and a wider spread of gears which means you can even climb hills. Shame there’s no tubing stated.
I don’t know anything about Lazaretti but it looks like a quality steel frame. It’s probably around forty years old so check the frame but they can last for yonks without problem, the worst of which may be corrosion, look inside the seat tube, which should turn easily. Seems to have been looked after.
One thing you should consider is that the geometry of the frame is quite racy as that was its original purpose. I don’t know what experience you have of riding bikes but it will feel quite different to a hybrid or mountain bike the ride being rather hard and unforgiving due to the high pressure narrow tyres so really only for the highway. The steering will also be rather twitchy and sensitive. If in doubt go for a test ride.
Price or value is down to you but I wouldn’t say it’s over priced.

Good luck.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Just to add a counterpoint to the above, it is a racing bike, but my first road bike was an 80s steel race bike, it was incredibly comfortable to ride - I did multiple 100+ mile rides on it with no problems, and whilst the handling was race-like, it was immense fun to ride.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Looks a nice bike.
From the marks on the stem, it looks like it was normally further into the head tube. There can't be much of the stem actually hidden, so make sure it can be lowered before you buy. Also check the seat post can move up and down as well.
 

Specialeyes

Veteran
Location
Essex
Lovely looking bike - my only other consideration to those above would be in relation to the gearing. With a 42-tooth inner chainring, even with a 32-tooth largest sprocket, that seems like quite tall gearing for touring in the SF Bay Area where, in my experience you're always riding up, down or across a hill!

Maybe see if you can knock the seller down the $50-$60 you'd need to spend to get something like a 50/34 or replace the inner ring on the existing one. (Can't clearly see from the photos how much smaller the inner ring would go before having to change the whole crankset, but you can get a 2nd-hand square taper crankset for about $60 online)
 
Location
Brussels
Looks to be a fine bike for spending a sunny Sunday out in the countryside with the wind at your back and a smile on your face.^_^

However, commuting and touring pose some questions. Commuting suggests a need for mudguards when the weather is bad (not obligatory but advisable) and some kind of small load carrying capacity. This bike has no mounting points for mudguards or a rack. neither issue is insurmountable, clip on mudguards and a messenger bag may be all you need, but it is something to think about.

By touring do you mean, tent stove and stuff and away into the wilderness or do you mean long day rides? The bike is not the best choice for the former , but, once the gearing is dealt with, should be great for the latter.

It's hard to tell from the photos as the light is a bit flat but the paint could be cromovelato, a paint finish where the paint is applied over chrome, if so, it will look a million dollars in the sunshine :becool:
 

battered

Über Member
That's a lovely bike. The price looks reasonable, it's been updated and looks clean. Is it a good starter bike? Hmm. Not really. It's a bit of a connoisseur bike. You can ride it, for sure, same as you could ride a 60s Brit motorcycle to work, or a 70s Alfa Romeo. It's going to be a bit more involved though, and you will need to up your mechanical game pretty promptly. A modern bike would be easier to live with.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Just found out that Lazzaretti have a bike shop in Rome, in fact for more than a hundred years and offer their own brand bikes, of which this seems to be one and are quite highly regarded.
 
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si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
That's a lovely bike. The price looks reasonable, it's been updated and looks clean. Is it a good starter bike? Hmm. Not really. It's a bit of a connoisseur bike. You can ride it, for sure, same as you could ride a 60s Brit motorcycle to work, or a 70s Alfa Romeo. It's going to be a bit more involved though, and you will need to up your mechanical game pretty promptly. A modern bike would be easier to live with.
I disagree, it'll be a fun bike to ride, the geometry is more traditional so a bit more upright despite the racier handling. As for the mechanical side, there is very little there to cause issue, other than the shifters being a bit older. It's a prime candidate for being upgraded later should the owner choose or switching back to a period correct build with downtube shifters. The only issue is likely to be an italian threaded BB should the desire arise to change cranks but are easily found online for all modern components as they are still in use now.
 
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