LEJOG for a couch pitato

bcabz

New Member
I am off work long term - have become partially sighted (likely eventually blind) and suffering from depression.
I need a a focus so, even though I am a 53 year old council potato, I want to build up for a LEJOG attempt in 2020.
Wrong side of 50, unfit, overweight. I will be using the cycle network’s route which is 1/3 longer than classic LEJOG but on mainly traffic-free paths (somewhat important as I am partially sighted!).
I will need a bike - my current one is just s Halfords £90 runaround mountain bike.

Looking for recommendations on (I believe) hybrid bike, below £1000, and helpful accessories - especially saddles and tyres.
 

DCLane

Found in the Yorkshire hills ...
A couple of thoughts:

- How long are you doing it over? 7 days is completely different to 30 days.
- Have you considered riding it as the 'stoker' on a tandem with a fully-sighted 'pilot'? You've not put where you're at but near to me are Tandem Trekkers who organise blind/partially sighted rides and there's likely to be similar near you.

You need a bike that fits you. That's the primary concern. I use a home-built Ridgeback Platinum for my distance rides as it's comfier and the set-up is totally different to my NeilPryde Nazare race bike.
 
OP
bcabz

bcabz

New Member
Wow, thanks for such a quick response!!! It really encouraged me!

I am thinking of 3-4 weeks so that if I have any setbacks it doesn’t deter me too much, and also so that I can take whatever stops I need to rest my eyes - or to feast them on the scenery.
I hadn’t thought of having a pilot. It’s really worth thinking of if my eyesight deteriorated but at this point, I think I should be ok (my eye surgeon says I should be) so long as I am not on traffic-filled roads.
I am based in Aberdeen
Thanks again for sharing ch a quick response!

A couple of thoughts:

- How long are you doing it over? 7 days is completely different to 30 days.
- Have you considered riding it as the 'stoker' on a tandem with a fully-sighted 'pilot'? You've not put where you're at but near to me are Tandem Trekkers who organise blind/partially sighted rides and there's likely to be similar near you.

You need a bike that fits you. That's the primary concern. I use a home-built Ridgeback Platinum for my distance rides as it's comfier and the set-up is totally different to my NeilPryde Nazare race bike.
Wow
 
OP
bcabz

bcabz

New Member
Haha, it takes me time, and sometimes software lol
But thank you!

QUOTE="Slow But Determined, post: 5667096, member: 74030"]Fair do's for someone partially sighted not one spelling error in your initial post.[/QUOTE]
 

Nebulous

Veteran
Location
Aberdeen
Good luck with your goal. What you need to do is build your fitness by riding miles. Don't worry about speed, get some miles in your legs. You need to find the right balance between building yourself up and overdoing it.

Company may help, to encourage you to go out regularly, regardless of the weather. Do you know anyone who cycles regularly?

Aim a little ahead of where you are. If you can do 3 miles, aim for 4. Don't let setbacks get you down, there will be another day.

I'm also in Aberdeen and we seriously lack cycling infrastructure. We also have a lot of traffic. Try to find low or no traffic routes, as you build your confidence. The railway lines are good, Duthie Park to Culter and the Dyce one runs right to Fraserburgh / Peterhead.
 
The question was what bike. It's a difficult question to answer if you don't have an idea of what you want as there are dozens.

Given your sight issues, your intention to do this on Sustrans paths over 4 weeks or so and I'm guessing you're carrying your own luggage then I would aim for a bike with some or all of the following characteristics.

I'm imagining that seeing the state of the road you're on might be an issue and avoiding poor surfaces sometimes difficult. In which case you want a stable bike with a long wheelbase and a relaxed geometry and quite possibly with larger more forgiving tyres. If carrying luggage you'll need braze one for racks and for touring, mudguards.

Effectively you're looking for a touring bike. You mention flat bars, so I would start by looking at something like a Ridgeback Expedition, flat bar, stable, large tyres, fully equipped with mudguards and racks. Let us know of this is the kind of thing you had in mind.

https://www.ridgeback.co.uk/bike/expedition
 
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MichaelW2

Veteran
What is the worst surface on this route.
I would suggest mixed use tread of typical hybrid width ie 35-38mm.
Disc brakes are useful for consistency in all conditions.
I find that it is hand position that is the limiting factor for long distance riding. Consider butterfly style euro trekking bars.
 
Further to what Michael says above, dropped or butterfly bars do give you more hand positions which help you avoid fatigue and numbness but flat bars are perfectly fine. I have both. My touring bike is an ex rigid mtn bike with flat bars.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
Butterfly bars enable you to retain mtb mtb controls which is a big advantage. Drop bars dont play well with low geared transmission systems.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Butterfly bars enable you to retain mtb mtb controls which is a big advantage. Drop bars dont play well with low geared transmission systems.
There is nothing wrong with drop bars and low gearing, you can get MTB gearing or adventure gearing readily with STI shifters
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
You're right, that was the question, but I'd delay any purchase for a wee while and begin to build up a few miles on the current bike, while window shopping.
Also, the more you ride your current bike the more you will come to know what you want in a new one. You'll know what you do and don't like about it and you won't need to ask us! ;)
 
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