Let's assume I had some spare cash...

which I don't, but they are bringing in bike loans at work (but only to a value of £250)...

Really fancy a go at SS/fixed, BUT, and that's a definite, I don't want drop bars...

Now, I fell in love with the Genesis Day One last year, when it was that beautiful understated black, but this year's silver version is rather nice as well:

http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/cross/day-one/day-one/overview/

Only thing is, that's £500.... The cheaper option would be this:

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/ebw...QRY=C224&f_SortOrderID=1&f_bct=c012528c021513

which is less than half the price of the Genesis, but doesn't quite have the wow factor... Apart from looks, has anybody got any views on these? Is the Genesis worth the extra money and if so why? Or do I start with the cheapo to see if I like it and then get a better one when I've crashed it to death trying to get to grips with riding fixed? The cheaper one also seems to have less nickability appeal, which, considering what it's going to be used for, might not be a bad idea...(it does get 8/10 in the cycling plus review0

Also, would I have to change the gearing on either or both of them being a feeble girlie? The plan is using it to commute instead of my mtb...it's fairly flat apart from one nasty hill - not particularly steep but a longish drag.

Any advice appreciated!!!
 

4F

Active member of Helmets Are Sh*t Lobby
Location
Suffolk.
I agree that the Genesis looks nicer however if you are on a budget the EBC will be fine, the drop handlebar options of the same bike gets goods reports and several people on here have got those.

The 44 x 16 gearing should be ideal as a starting point. I ride with 48 x 16 and have not found a hill yet that I cannot get up however given that I live in Suffolk there are not that many to try :becool:
 
OP
punkypossum

punkypossum

Donut Devil
Hmmm... thanks 4F, have to admit I'm leaning towards the cheapo option at the moment, a) because it's, well, cheap :becool: because I quite fancy pimping it up as I go along and c) I would feel far less worried about it getting nicked when in town, at work, etc - not that your typical bike thief really seems to care, but hey...
 

Landslide

Rare Migrant
I'd be tempted towards the EBC Track due to the wheels (700c*25c vs 26"*1.6" on the Courier).
Always worth investigating if the shop would swap the bars + brake levers for a flat bar set-up.
 
OP
punkypossum

punkypossum

Donut Devil
Good idea, but the commute is pothole heaven (most of it is gravel path through the park one way, mixed with cracked concrete full of holes)...I'm quite happy with the 26" inch ones!!!
 

Landslide

Rare Migrant
Fairy 'nuff! :ohmy:
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
In my opinion, as low end bikes seem to have poor resell qualities so if you dont like it then you will probly lose more cash than if you spend more and resell, and chances are you will love riding fixed anyway. For £500 you could build up a very nice bike (new, not some conversion or hack). I wouldnt spend £500 on an off the peg fixed now that I have been riding fixed.

It may not be your dream fixed bike for £500, but at least it will be a step closer than buying something off the peg then later wanting re-sprays, wheels, different bar config (and hence diff brake levers) and all the other things that you later want. You may spend something like £250 on some off the peg bike, then spend £400 upgrading it to get it how you wished it had been in the 1st place. Especially if you change bars straight away, thats like ~£30 on new bars and then appropriate levers for what ~£20. Although if the shop will swap could be avoided.

BTW wtf is up with the rear wheel clearence on that EBC bike? Running smaller wheels or what? If so, can it take 700c if you want to in the future? I'd run 700c and put some bombproof wheels on a commuting fixed wheel bike, that would survive commuting just fine, but this is my cosmetic preference, I hate large clearences :ohmy:
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
colinr said:
It could if my imaginary custom build didn't start with a Cinelli Mash frame and forks :ohmy:
heh, nice frame, seen the new one? Limited run though, only 100 made or something.

But what I mean is you can buy some nice new frames such as the Leader frames for about £200, or if you want something bomb proof a Charge scissor frame is only like £230. Or a Volume Cutter about £300. The latter two are admittedly trick frames, but as these things will take the abuse of slamming down 2 sets of stairs with a rider on them, they will never break from hitting pot holes or 'normal' crashes. Plus with the Volume frames lifetime guarentee (and its made for slamming about of curbs etc, so they wont turn round and say its because you rode it like a madman or its not made for this, the product decription states what its made for). Put some comfy seat and bars on them and some sturdy wheels and you have a commuter that will outlive your children, choice of handlebars will allow them to be set up in pretty much any config. They wont take a rack, but they will take wider tyres if so required.

If you like a genesis because you like the nice frame colour, but prefer this EBC bikes price tag and go for the EBC. At a later date you will wish the EBC bike looked like the Genesis, or if you buy the Genesis you will wish it had some other attribute that you now have to pay to change (for example putting nicer wheels on it). With the simplicity of a fixed bike imo, it pays to just build your own.

I have a Fuji track right now, its got crap wheels and the frame looks ugly (metallic greyish colour) cost £330, ive spent about £150 on it so far with brakes and TT bars, if i get it sprayed and put new wheels on it, there is about another £300. If I knew what I do now (still not much admittedly, hehe :smile:), I'd have built up my perfect base fixie for about £750, i.e. less than modifying some off the peg bike to suit my tastes as I learnt more about how I like to ride. If your needs are already well set out, then you may save even more money going the custom build route.



Anyways, just another option to complicate your decision ;)
 

colinr

Well-Known Member
Location
Norwich
If I knew what I know now, I'd have still gone OTP on my fixed because I needed to learn what I do and don't like. Fortunately, I like nearly all of it, but would have gone down a frame size as I prefer the more aggressive ride position.

If you just want a commuter and don't want to trick out your bike, I reckon OTP offers better value. Unfortunately I crossed that line and now lust after expensive deep section wheelsets and the like :sad:
 
OP
punkypossum

punkypossum

Donut Devil
This is the thing - I want a commuter and a bike that I don't worry about too much, plus see how I get on with the whole ss/fixed thing. I can see where Rob3rt is coming from, but building one (apart from being totally non-tech and not component savy enough) would not only turn out to be more expensive, it would also make me care for the bike far too much to feel happy leaving it (not only because it's more expensive, but because I build it). Also, don't think the work bike loan would cover that. Plus, never having ridden fixed before, a few crashes are in order, so I might as well get them out of the way on a cheap bike! And the geometry on the ebc is pretty much exactly the same as my current mtb, which fits like a glove, so at least I wouldn't have to worry about that.
 

colinr

Well-Known Member
Location
Norwich
I don't think riding fixed will make you crash! The only times I've come off have been down to those special clipless moments.
 
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