Light Rims vs Aero Rims

Sam Kennedy

New Member
Location
Newcastle
Would I be better off investing money in a lightweight rim, rather than a deep aero rim? I may or may not have caught the wheel building bug... xx(

It is normally around £250 for some lightweight(~1700g, maybe not *too* light) wheels, so I would want to spend around £50 on a hub, £150-170 on a rim, and whatever is left on spokes. (How much should I expect to pay for say, 32 aluminium spokes and 32 brass nipples?)

Cheers!
 

Landslide

Rare Migrant
Depends what you want the wheel to do really.

And you'll probably get steel spokes, not aluminium.
 
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Sam Kennedy

Sam Kennedy

New Member
Location
Newcastle
Ah sorry I meant stainless steel, not sure why I thought aluminium.
I didn't know I would have to put more money into a hub, is that where the greater weight saving is?
 

Landslide

Rare Migrant
No, the tyres and rims are the most important place to save weight as their rotational mass is greater.
However, for general road riding, my recommendation is always for a pair of Mavic Open Pro rims (£30-40 each), laced to the best hubs you can afford.
Get some decent double-butted spokes. DT Swiss and Sapim have a reputation for being the best (conventional) spokes, but I've always got on fine with ACI.
Bear in mind that a massive amount of how good a set of wheels are will lie in how well they've been built.
 

accountantpete

Brexiteer
The problem is buying the parts for wheels costs as much as a set of factory made wheels.

Also the key area is getting the spoke tension right if you want proper performance.

Basically a good quality lightweight wheel gives a nicer feel IMHO, as they get you up to speed a lot quicker and are great around town or going uphill. Aero's tend to wallow a bit in these conditions but they are far better on long flat runs,going downhill or in windy conditions.

I wouldn't get carried away with the idea that you can build a great set of wheels without a lot of practice first though.
 

Landslide

Rare Migrant
accountantpete said:
Aero's tend to wallow a bit in these conditions but they are far better on long flat runs,going downhill or in windy conditions.
I thought they were a bit of a 'mare in windy condtions, especially if it gusts from the side.
accountantpete said:
I wouldn't get carried away with the idea that you can build a great set of wheels without a lot of practice first though.
True dat.
 
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