lino over kitchen tiles?

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
our kitchen tiles are worse for wear .
Tried painting them with specialist hard-wearing paint that just just terrible , its costing me about £15 a sq mtr in paint stripper to get it off though and a lot of elbow grease,
I have read you can put lino over ties if you fill the grout so its flush or it really a case of rip it up and stat again ?
 

screenman

Legendary Member
our kitchen tiles are worse for wear .
Tried painting them with specialist hard-wearing paint that just just terrible , its costing me about £15 a sq mtr in paint stripper to get it off though and a lot of elbow grease,
I have read you can put lino over ties if you fill the grout so its flush or it really a case of rip it up and stat again ?
A layer of 4mm ply and then your lino, or a self levelling screed would work.
 

Poacher

Gravitationally challenged member
Location
Nottingham
About 20 years ago I used self-levelling screed over our old quarry-tiled kitchen floor, then vinyl flooring.
No problem whatsoever.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
If the tiles are stable then no problem, you can use a latex screed over them which will provide a suitable surface for the Lino, but do you mean Lino or a sheet vinyl? You can lay the screed yourself.
I think you should consider real Lino as it's 100% green and is very hard wearing plus it comes in loads of colours . Better still it's made in Scotland. Laying is best left to experts though.
Bit of history here,
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-44128557
 
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SpokeyDokey

Into my 64th
Moderator
We have some unattractive quarry tiles in our entrance hallway - I used some of the 'underlay' that you put under laminate flooring underneath the vinyl that we used. The vinyl was quite costly and is pretty thick.

It has been down yonks and still looks like new - no sign of the grouted joints showing through.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
If the tiles are stable then no problem, you can use a latex screed over them which will provide a suitable surface for the Lino, but do you mean Lino or a sheet vinyl? You can lay the screed yourself.
I think you should consider real Lino as it's 100% green and is very hard wearing plus it comes in loads of colours . Better still it's made in Scotland. Laying is best left to experts though.
Bit of history here,
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-44128557
It is expensive though.

Most people confuse Vinyl flooring and Linoleum as well,
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
We just put lino straight over the ceramic tiles. Fed up of anything that touched the floor exploding.
 

Bazzer

Setting the controls for the heart of the sun.
If the floor tiles are secure I would go for a self levelling compound. If you rip up the tiles, you may end up with an uneven surface which you will have to deal with anyway.
Just make sure the revised depth you will create can be coped with; e.g.doors.
 
If the tiles are well-established, level, sound and damp proof but just scruffy there is no problem just putting good quality vinyl/lino over them as they are. A levelling screed or underlay are not essential, but a soft underlay might be useful to cut down noise if you are putting down hard-surface vinyl.
 

slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
If the tiles are not loose, I would clean them thoroughly and pour on some self-levelling screed to flatten the surface. You may need to prime the surface to ensure adequate bonding. You will need to push the screed about with a brush or squeegee to help it level before it stiffens up. It's good fun.
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
I don't think it's that expensive but it's been some time since I bought some and I paid trade. Some vinyl is very expensive, check out Amtico.
Karndean is an excellent alternative to Amtico which, as you say, is fairly astronomical in price. We've got it in the hall and kitchen. The hall has been down 15 years and it still looks unworn
 
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