Loctite?

Norry1

Guru
Location
Warwick
In my (motor) biking days - people used to use loctite on certain important bolts etc to ensure they did not work loose.

Is this also done for bikes and if so, which bits are normally done?

Martin
 
Cleat bolts!
 

Davidc

Guru
Location
Somerset UK
Luggage rack mountings mudguards, and lights. never had a problem with anything else. Loctite is too strong on a bike - nail varnish works just as well and cracks open with much less force.
 

accountantpete

Brexiteer
Certain parts can work loose but this is largely down to the design/make of the individual component so there is no hard and fast rule.
 

zacklaws

Veteran
Location
Beverley
I use it on my water bottle holders as they have a tendency to come loose on one of my roadbikes and have no problems with unscrewing them when I need too.
 

HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
I've never had to do it. Bicycles don't vibrate and there are no hidden or hard-to-reach bolts.

??? Your tyres must be very soft or you ride on extra smooth tarmac, I have had to use Loctite on rack mountings, mudguards, etc ...
 

postman

Legendary Member
Location
,Leeds
Well well well .only a few weeks ago my mates crank fell off while we were riding to Grassington .Again a weel later when we went to York .He hit the kerb edge and broke two ribs .
Later that week his lbs used a loctite compound to repair it .Repair worked he has now sold the bike on .
 

ASC1951

Guru
Location
Yorkshire
??? Your tyres must be very soft or you ride on extra smooth tarmac, I have had to use Loctite on rack mountings, mudguards, etc ...

My tyres are up there at 120 psi and I ride on the same lumpy roads as Postman. Granted, I don't use rack mounting or mudguards and I do check over the bike regularly. My stuff doesn't come loose.
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I often stop for tea
Location
Dumnoniorum
What seems to work for me is making sure the threads are clean and lubricated on assembly, and using washers appropriately. Washers are important.
 

BrumJim

Forum Stalwart (won't take the hint and leave...)
Washers, certainly plain and spring washers, actually increase the chances of a screw untightening.
Loctite comes in various different strengths, of course. 222 is probably the most appropriate stuff for bikes. 243 is a bit strong, and 272 is as good as welding the thing up, so not recommended.
 
OP
OP
Norry1

Norry1

Guru
Location
Warwick
Washers, certainly plain and spring washers, actually increase the chances of a screw untightening.
Loctite comes in various different strengths, of course. 222 is probably the most appropriate stuff for bikes. 243 is a bit strong, and 272 is as good as welding the thing up, so not recommended.

I've since noticed blue stuff on some bolts on my new bikes. I'm assuming this is threadlock.

Guess I'll just see what works loose and threadlock them.

Martin
 

TheDoctor

Europe Endless
Moderator
Location
Stevenage
Or threadlock.
IIRC the weaker threadlock is blue, and you often get bolts with a blob of it partway down the thread - patchlock, they're called.
 

Svendo

Guru
Location
Walsden
Loctite 243 is blue.
I've used it on chainring bolts. The one time I didn't one came loose and was lost. I find it undoes with a satisfying 'crack' using a standard allen key.
My Boss at work uses superglue, no idea if this is wise or how easy it is to undo. He is an old bloke so he'll have been doing it for years so I suppose it works.
The other function threadlock fulfills is to completely fill the gap in the threads and prevent ingress of water and therefore galvanic corrosion, so the bolt should always undo with the same set difficulty.
I've also noticed some component's threads (e.g. Dura Ace BB) come with some compound in the valleys of some of the threads in the middle, distinct from the translucent green grease that's preapplied, I've wondered what this is.
 
Top Bottom