Look Keo Easy clipless pedals

It's about time I took the plunge and went clipless. I've been looking at the Keo Easy pedals as they are recommended for clipless beginners and would like any opinions about them. If I get on with them (fitted to my Langster initially) I may put a pair on my MTB so could anyone also suggest I nice shoe that will work with these pedals for both road and off-road (and down the pub!) please? I don't want an out-and-out road shoe.

Bill
 

bianchi1

Guru
Location
malverns
I have been riding clipless for years and find look keo harder to clip in than the old look style. This is due to the non slip rubber bits on the cleats getting caught on the peddals. Once they are in tho they are fine.

Also they are not the best for off road or pub as the cleats are 'outside' the shoe. You will be much better with a spd type system.
 

accountantpete

Brexiteer
The Look Keo utilises the large triangular cleat similar to Shimano spd-sl and Time pedals.

These are full-on road pedals and require similar shoes.

Suggest you look towards Shimano spd pedals
 
Thanks Bianchi1, I was just browsing through pedals in Condor's store the other day and thought they looked just the job. That said, Shimano make a similar-looking pedal (well at least to me) that may suit.....any ideas on shoes for them? As I said I would prefer a more MTB shoe that wouldn't look too out of place on a road bike.
 
TheBoyBilly said:
Thanks Bianchi1, I was just browsing through pedals in Condor's store the other day and thought they looked just the job. That said, Shimano make a similar-looking pedal (well at least to me) that may suit.....any ideas on shoes for them? As I said I would prefer a more MTB shoe that wouldn't look too out of place on a road bike.
I went for A520 touring pedals and Spesh BG MTB Sport. I don't think either look out of place on a road bike. The shoes are slightly lighter and stiffer soled than other mtb shoes which means that walking long distances might be problematic, but they are certainly walkable and offer better efficiency IMO on the bike.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
The I-Click pedal from Time is designed for ease of entry. As far as I know from reading a product review the pedal is in the open position by default, which means you just put your foot on it and it clicks closed against the cleat as you press down, rather than having to force it open to engage. A bit pricey compared to entry level pedals, but they generally last for ages so worth a look -

http://www.evanscycles.com/products...oogle&utm_medium=froogle&utm_campaign=froogle
 
Thanks for all your suggestions. I think I will go down the SPD route now and, next payday, will pop down to my favourite LBS in Sandgate (Folkestone) and buy Shimano M545 pedals for my Langster (described as general purpose/mtb pedals) and see how I get on with them. I shall purchase Specialized Primo shoes to go with them. If I don't get on with either I will easily be able to sell them on and try something else. I like the fact that the M545s have a 'pop-up' system allowing the use of normal shoes if needed.

Thanks again,

Bill
 
Thanks for all your suggestions. I think I will go down the SPD route now and, next payday, will pop down to my favourite LBS in Sandgate (Folkestone) and buy Shimano M545 pedals for my Langster (described as general purpose/mtb pedals) and see how I get on with them. I shall purchase Specialized Primo shoes to go with them. If I don't get on with either I will easily be able to sell them on and try something else. I like the fact that the M545s have a 'pop-up' system allowing the use of normal shoes if needed.

Thanks again,

Bill
I use the similar M424's on my utility bike they're are not perfect with ordinary shoes, I find the pop-up doesn't recess far enough and I end up pedalling with the arch of my foot rather than the ball but they do suffice for that odd trip to the pub (say 3-4miles and back) :biggrin:

The shoes look fine,

Good Luck
 
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