Modern or vintage

Bluebirdjay

Regular
Location
Plymouth
Hi there,

As most people asking for advice on buying bikes I am pretty new to this! I am planning a pretty lengthy tour over several months across Europe and probably need a bike for it...

I have a budget of around 750 pounds, with 2 general options:

a. Spend the 750 on a modern bike and be done with it
b. Spend around 200 on a second hand older bike and spend 200 on new tyres etc. making sure it is all good.

I currently ride (not especially far) a 5 pound spray paint red, lever gear road bike so I am pretty comfortable with slightly dodgy bikes but as this will be a long tour I want to get something I am confident in. I am pretty drawn to the vintage bikes as they are a more reasonable cost but I also understand the positives of a modern bike.

Any ideas in either direction would be aprecited a lot!

Thanks :smile:

Emily
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
You should be able to pick up an older Galaxy for around the £200 mark but it may need more than tyres. check out flEa-bay
 

swee'pea99

Legendary Member
There's no reason to suppose a well-chosen 2nd hand bike off ebay will be in any way 'dodgy' - legally or otherwise - and you'll always get a much better deal for your money by getting used rather than new. The downside is a) you need to know what you're after, and what you're looking at, and which questions to ask to make sure you don't buy a pup or just something that won't suit you, and b) you can't try before you buy.

One possible solution, depending on how soon you plan to leave, is to log a search with ebay, specifying all the basic criteria that matter to you, and include 'must be within 15 (or whatever) miles'. Then any possibles that come up, you can arrange to go for a test ride/poke the tyres. (If the seller won't respond/agree to reasonable requests, then leave it.)
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
I think the big question is: How much do you like fiddling with bikes? And also ... how much time do you have.

If you have time, and you like doing this stuff, then you will end up with pretty much exactly what you want, because you've chosen the bits, and you'll have pride in the bike, and you'll be better prepared for on-road problems. But if it's a chore, or if you're short of time, then go for the complete buy option.

Make sure you have your chosen range of gears planned before you buy/ start building.
 
OP
B

Bluebirdjay

Regular
Location
Plymouth
Hi all

Thanks for this! It clarifies a few things :smile: I am hoping that I will be able to pick up a pretty decent second hand frame with gears already and then just to add the tyres, so we shall see what a few eBay searches will bring up!

Thanks again.

Emily
 
OP
B

Bluebirdjay

Regular
Location
Plymouth

vickster

Legendary Member
Calling @Jerry Atrik

Just noticed he's in South Devon and you in Plymouth, must be fate :smile:
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
Touring bikes are durable and hold their value well. Std model such as Dawes Galaxy are good and there are scores of small brands and builders. Surley LHT is a heavier style of tourer than the classic Reynold 531ST frame. My 1995 BobJackson World Tour is lighter than most aluminium hybrids.
There are very few issues with used tourers beyond the obvious crash damage and transmission wear, but they are used hard, so beware worn rims. Tourer brakes are often substandard or tricky to tune, matching road levers to MTB cantilevers. Some models (such as mine) have limitted tyre clearance to 32mm.
Bar-end levers (as opposed to STI) have advantages:
Long-pull brake levers.
Can operate any front mech.
Easier cable routing for bar bags.

I prefer 8 speed to higher sprocket counts, thicker metal means you can fit cheaper cogs and indexing has more tolerance.
 
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