Need some bike repair advice

Doobiesis

Über Member
Location
Poole Dorset
I was going to put my daughters hybrid in for the chain and replace the mudguards as she wants to cycle to work, she’s a key worker. But with everything closed I decided to attempt it myself.

I have been looking to what chain would be suitable, but it’s confusing me! Her hybrid has only got 3 gears. Can anyone give me some idea of what I’m buying is right.

Also, how do I know what size tyres she has to fit some new mudguards.

will be very grateful for any help.
 

the snail

Veteran
Location
Chippenham
Usually 1/8 chain on a 3sp. Have a look at the markings on the tyres, that will tell you what size they are
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
The chain for a hub gear bike can be either of 2 widths, 1/8 or 3/32.
3/32 chains come either in derailleur shifter or single speed/hub gear.
The most likely is probably 3/32 singlespeed. KMC make them in several finishes, the rust free ones are useful.
You will need a chain tool to cut the chain to the correct number of links and use a quick link ( often supplied with chain) to join the loop without tools.
What is the make and model if the the bike?
Check wear on the rear toothed sprocket. Severe sharks fin wear will slip on a new chain.

For mudguards, look at the tyre size, eg a number on the tyre sidewall such as 700c x 38 or 38x622.
Best type is SKS Chromoplastic.
 
OP
Doobiesis

Doobiesis

Über Member
Location
Poole Dorset
The chain for a hub gear bike can be either of 2 widths, 1/8 or 3/32.
3/32 chains come either in derailleur shifter or single speed/hub gear.
The most likely is probably 3/32 singlespeed. KMC make them in several finishes, the rust free ones are useful.
You will need a chain tool to cut the chain to the correct number of links and use a quick link ( often supplied with chain) to join the loop without tools.
What is the make and model if the the bike?
Check wear on the rear toothed sprocket. Severe sharks fin wear will slip on a new chain.

For mudguards, look at the tyre size, eg a number on the tyre sidewall such as 700c x 38 or 38x622.
Best type is SKS Chromoplastic.
Thank you so much 😊
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
Unless you 'have to' I recommend that you leave the chain, giving a good oil and wipe, and repeat, and repeat. [Edit: see several comments below reiterating this. It's amazing how you can get a chain that looking rusty-dead to come alive again, with some additional friction but satisfactory function.]
Mudguards should be at least 5mm more than the width of the inflated tyre, which you can measure (to confirm the sidewall markings). Most mudguards will say what range of tyre widths they'd be suitable for.
 
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OP
Doobiesis

Doobiesis

Über Member
Location
Poole Dorset
Unless you 'have to' I recommend that you leave the chain, giving a good oil and wipe, and repeat, and repeat.
Mudguards should be at least 5mm more than the width of the inflated tyre, which you can measure (to confirm the sidewall markings). Most mudguards will say what range of tyre widths they'd be suitable for.
It has to be changed as it’s rusty.
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
It has to be changed as it’s rusty.
OK.
You will need chain splitter, like this one: other makes and sellers are available - to remove the chain. You should be able to measure the width of the chain - and see comments above - could be either of the two widths.
http://hub.chainreactioncycles.com/buying-guides/components/chains-buying-guide/
If you have a local bike shop open (and some are), they will sell and cut the chain to length 'on the spot': they'll need to know the width and length, of course, so take the chain with you. Ask for a spare short length in addition, to practise on (see below). If you buy a chain on line, you must measure, carefully, the current chain. Its length will be an exact number of inches/multiple of 25.4mm and this measurement is much easier once the chain is removed. Then cut the new chain to the correct length. Reconnecting the chain needs practice, so may be worth 'practising' on the end of the chain you will expect to cut off.
 
OP
Doobiesis

Doobiesis

Über Member
Location
Poole Dorset
OK.
You will need chain splitter, like this one: other makes and sellers are available - to remove the chain. You should be able to measure the width of the chain - and see comments above - could be either of the two widths.
http://hub.chainreactioncycles.com/buying-guides/components/chains-buying-guide/
If you have a local bike shop open (and some are), they will sell and cut the chain to length 'on the spot': they'll need to know the width and length, of course, so take the chain with you. Ask for a spare short length in addition, to practise on (see below). If you buy a chain on line, you must measure, carefully, the current chain. Its length will be an exact number of inches/multiple of 25.4mm and this measurement is much easier once the chain is removed. Then cut the new chain to the correct length. Reconnecting the chain needs practice, so may be worth 'practising' on the end of the chain you will expect to cut off.
Thank you, I think I will call up my local bike shop tomorrow, see if I can take the bike in. Seems so much work to change the chain plus I don’t have any tools.
 

biggs682

Smile a mile bike provider
Location
Northamptonshire
It has to be changed as it’s rusty.

Why like @Milkfloat says put some oil on it and as long as none of the links are seized solid it will or should loosen up as you use it a couple of repeat operation and it should be fine for a few more miles .

As for tyre size i would guess at 700c but it could 27" depending how old it is .

Pictures would help quite often the size is on the rim as well
 

CanucksTraveller

Macho Business Donkey Wrestler
Location
Hertfordshire
I'm with Milkfloat, sometimes chains can look rusty (particularly on kids bikes that get looked after less) but the chains are often saveable and perfectly useable with a good clean. Do the links move normally? It's only really too far gone when the links are too stiff to move.

I'd use WD40 or similar plus an old cloth to get rid of the rust, then re oil. Oil on it's own will work, eventually. Use an old t shirt torn into rags to run the chain through as you oil it.
 

Paulus

Started young, and still going.
Location
Barnet,
I'm with the above posters. A rusty chain can often be rescued as long as it is not seized. a good clean and lube often suffices.
 
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