Possibly change of bike ?

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by Doug., 2 May 2010.

  1. Doug.

    Doug. Über Member

    Hello.
    I have cycled for many years on an old carlton.
    Three years past I decided to cycle more and longer distances.
    I bought an alloy frame,carbon (ish) fork,27 gear roadster/racer,weight 8.8 k.
    The price from a local shop was about £500.
    As I am realy enjoying my riding,usualy 25 to 45 kilometres I wonder if it's time to "upgrade" to a better bike?
    I have no troubles with the present bike but wonder if a better cycle would make the distances easier (I am not a youngster) more speed and make the hils not as difficult,the later most important !
    Also things such as better gear changes etc.

    What do readers think ?
    If a change is beneficial any recomendations of make ?
    My budget is limited to about £1,200.
    Equaly so should I change components to a better quality,wheels and gears etc. and keep existing bike ?
    Sorry to have rambled on so much.
    Thank you and best wishes.
    Yours
    Doug..
     
  2. montage

    montage God Almighty

    Location:
    Bethlehem
    If you have the money then by all means get a nicer bike - but as you said, there is nothign wrong with your existing one.
    A nicer bike will be a nicer ride for sure - what makes does your local bike shop deal?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Doug.

    Doug. Über Member

    Montage.
    Thank you for the reply.
    The L.B.S stock or can obtain I think just about any make.
    I live in France and bought my mentioned bike from a firm called Intersport,maybe they have shops in the U.K?
    Have a good range
    of cycles including there own brand (above a certain price reconded to be good)
    But within
    the last couple of years a l.b.s has opened who are very good and with whome I now deal.
    Yours
    Doug.
     
  4. accountantpete

    accountantpete Legendary Member

    Ideally for hills you want a nice light responsive frame and wheels which are also plenty stiff enough.

    The trouble is that the increased stiffness often leads to increased vibration from the road.

    Personally I'd go halfway to start with and look at a decent pair of lightweight factory wheels costing £300-500 - they are especially good for climbing.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Doug.

    Doug. Über Member

    Pete.
    Thanks.
    Regards
    Doug.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Doug.

    Doug. Über Member

    Hello.
    Thank you for the reply.
    I am prepaired to buy a quality set of wheels,please will you explain the advantage ?
    All best wishes
    Doug.
     
  7. accountantpete

    accountantpete Legendary Member

    I should explain that you can get lightweight handbuilts as well if you know a good wheelbuilder - but I use factory as a preference.

    Basically lower weight wheels produce the same forward momentum for less energy. The rims and spokes have less flex and the superior hubs/bearings produce less friction so you are not wasting energy as such.

    I'm no scientist but can assure you that they do work!

    Basically as a very general guide the weights you should be looking at are front 700g and rear 950g.

    On the downside the factory builts generally use special spokes which can be expensive to repair.

    There are also aero wheels - a good set will be neutral/slightly worse going uphill but compensate by being better on the flat/downhill.
     
  8. montage

    montage God Almighty

    Location:
    Bethlehem
    most aero wheels are carbon...bringing the weight down - but upping the price.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Doug.

    Doug. Über Member

    Pete.

    Thank you so much for the detailed reply.
    I shall indeed give better wheels a try.
    Regards
    Doug.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Doug.

    Doug. Über Member

    Montage.
    Thank you.
    Regards
    Doug.
     
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