Repair or buy new

kenam

Regular
Hey - I have a 2010 cube peloton that I have mostly kept serviced and cleaned up regularly (Chains/brake cables/cassettes etc over the years).

I noticed recently a couple of issues tho:

Steering stiff - (new headset bearings)
Carbon fork - bubling around the paint (Could be the alu/carbon bonding loose - probably a new fork)
Bottom bracket creaky (but always has been - so can let it slide a bit)
Brake calipers get on a bit, but still functional
and finally - the trusty shimano R500 rear wheel gave up and imploded on me (it had been buckled and repaired so many times)!

I have a bike stand and some time on my hands so was thinking about buying some parts to fix it up (I guess for around 300).

Any thoughts on this? I dont really want to buy a new bike until I can afford something much better and I enjoy the size/ feel of what I had - but is it crazy to spend so much on an old bike?
 

Slick

Guru
Definitely not, you won't need a new bike when you do the old girl proud. Get her fixed. :okay:
 
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K

kenam

Regular
Just need to dig out a bunch of tutorials etc as sometimes my confidence exceeds my abilities!

First question tho - what should I replace the carbon/alu fork with? A quick google shows 10 years from a bonded carbon fork is good. Should I look for the same, or just put an all Aluminium in?
 

Slick

Guru
Just need to dig out a bunch of tutorials etc as sometimes my confidence exceeds my abilities!

First question tho - what should I replace the carbon/alu fork with? A quick google shows 10 years from a bonded carbon fork is good. Should I look for the same, or just put an all Aluminium in?
YouTube is magic for all your maintenance needs. :okay:
I'm a bit of a traditionalist, so I prefer to replace like for like, but I'm funny like that. :thumbsup:
 

mcshroom

Bionic Subsonic
I'd probably stick with a carbon fork. SJS and Spa cycles usually have some decent ones, but if you use normal short drop brakes then thete s lots around. Make sure it has the same dimensions as the old one.

If you like the bike, and it fits you, then why not fix what you have, and keep the memories :smile:
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
It is tempting to draw comparison with bikes from an earlier age when they didn't have carbon forks, press fit BBs or wheels that seem to have missing spokes. Nine years until the bike has effectively come to the end of its economic life is pretty poor especially when you consider many old Raleigh and other steel framed bikes are still going strong without having to replace any of the main components or maybe not needing servicing.
Just an observation :smile:.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
It probably could use a new bottom bracket, a new rear wheel, and some new carbon forks, but that expense would still be much less than a current, better bicycle in that range. Better to keep going with this bicycle, and save it for a back-up when you get the new bike.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
It is tempting to draw comparison with bikes from an earlier age when they didn't have carbon forks, press fit BBs or wheels that seem to have missing spokes. Nine years until the bike has effectively come to the end of its economic life is pretty poor especially when you consider many old Raleigh and other steel framed bikes are still going strong without having to replace any of the main components or maybe not needing servicing.
Just an observation :smile:.
A very small fraction of the countless millions that were produced. And bearings always wore and needed replacing or adjusting.
 
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kenam

Regular
Im not sure it is beyond economical repair - I think its more me trying to justify spending even more on something else (which I cant!)

Common sense (with a dash of Sentimentality) prevails and repairs on the way. Sorry to admins - but I am probably going to start some threads while I work out what exactly to buy.
 
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