Replacement for my 2015 Defy

daverave

Über Member
I'm in the market for a replacement to my Giant Defy 1 2015 version, which I probably needs quite a bit of repair. I enjoyed my Defy, but I have noticed that the new Defy models cost much more that the £999 I paid in 2015. Has the spec improved that much?

Also, if I were to change anything on my original Defy, it would be the gear ratios... I do live at the top of a long steep hill, and at 17 stone I found it quite demanding at times and always looking for that Granny Wheel! Any recommendations for a new bike, around the £1000 mark, that would be an upgrade and suit my needs?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
The spec probably hasn’t improved (maybe now disc brakes), prices have gone up massively as demand has surged and supply been decimated by Covid. There are also v few discounts. I don’t know if you’ll get 105 on an alu frame for a grand nowadays.
There’s a carbon 105 Boardman, for about £1200 but rim brakes
 
OP
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daverave

Über Member
What about the Giant Contend 1? Have just read that these were intended to replace the Defy, and has the 34 tooth cassette, which should help me with that hill! OR is the Contend essentially a downgrade on my existing Defy 1 2015?
 

Dolorous Edd

Senior Member
Your bike is only 5-6 years old. Unless you have seriously abused it, spending £200-£300 at your local bike shop getting a full refurbishment including a change of gear ratios will very probably result in a nicer bike than anything you could buy new for £1,000, given current elevated prices.
 

roubaixtuesday

self serving virtue signaller
I'm in the market for a replacement to my Giant Defy 1 2015 version, which I probably needs quite a bit of repair. I enjoyed my Defy, but I have noticed that the new Defy models cost much more that the £999 I paid in 2015. Has the spec improved that much?

Also, if I were to change anything on my original Defy, it would be the gear ratios... I do live at the top of a long steep hill, and at 17 stone I found it quite demanding at times and always looking for that Granny Wheel! Any recommendations for a new bike, around the £1000 mark, that would be an upgrade and suit my needs?
Bike prices had gone up significantly even pre-pandemic and supply means zero chance of discounts now, so there's no way you'll get an upgrade on your 2015 for the same price, likely quite the opposite.

Most road groupsets now run to an option for at least 34T on the rear - depending on what's on the current one, that's probably a gear or two lower.

If you want an upgrade for a grand I'd recommend new cables inner & outer, bar tape, new rear cassette to 34T, new derailleur to suit if the current lacks the capacity and a nice new wheelset with quality tyres - get something strong for your weight.

If you want a brand new bike with an "upgrade", however defined, you probably need to double your budget, and be lucky enough to be able to actually find stock, though maybe somewhere like PX might show up a bargain.
 
OP
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daverave

Über Member
A refurb is my other option, and one I would consider if its just £200 to £300! Perhaps I'll take it to my bike shop for some advice. I know I stated £1000 for a new bike, but it would be on a cycle to work scheme, so much cheaper and of course, new!
 

vickster

Legendary Member
A refurb is my other option, and one I would consider if its just £200 to £300! Perhaps I'll take it to my bike shop for some advice. I know I stated £1000 for a new bike, but it would be on a cycle to work scheme, so much cheaper and of course, new!
Not a bargain, if you can't buy anything worth buying though :okay:
Some C2W schemes do (or at least did) allow the purchase of parts so you might be able to get the parts, wheels, tyres...and just pay for the fitting/ servicing if can't do yourself.

Which C2W scheme can you use, can you top up, or borrow more (as limits were increased). If a commuter, make sure the bike is suitable for the purpose
 
OP
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daverave

Über Member
Great advice... my local bike shop it is! Thanks all.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
A refurb is my other option, and one I would consider if its just £200 to £300! Perhaps I'll take it to my bike shop for some advice. I know I stated £1000 for a new bike, but it would be on a cycle to work scheme, so much cheaper and of course, new!
About 3 years ago I took my similarly aged bike to my LBS. The drive train was absolutely done for, chainrings worn out, one shifter broken, BB had play in it. I was deliberately running it into the ground with this job in mind when the shifter forced my hand by breaking.

I did my research and decided on 105 R7000, which has a 34/34 lowest gear. Yay!

I negotiated best price on the components by finding how much they were going for on various web shops so I wasn't paying full whack. They did some other stuff that was needed too. The whole job came out at something over £500 I think. I got a near as dammit new bike at the end, and yet it was still my old bike too. Which was just what I wanted.

It really depends if you have an LBS with a sympathetic ear who are prepared to listen to what you want doing, not just say "we do this" which may or may not be right for you.
 

Chislenko

Senior Member
It's only six years old, I wouldn't even consider looking at a new one.

What exactly does it need?

If you buy a new bike things will wear out and need replacing in time, that's just the way it is.

As many people on here have said previously spend some time learning how to do your own maintenance then you cut out that part of the expense. Bikes are very simple machines and there any number of you tube videos to help you.
 

fair weather cyclist

Well-Known Member
A refurb is my other option, and one I would consider if its just £200 to £300! Perhaps I'll take it to my bike shop for some advice. I know I stated £1000 for a new bike, but it would be on a cycle to work scheme, so much cheaper and of course, new!
I say yours is a good approach and you need pragmatic.

Decide exactly how much you're willing to spend on a 6 years old bike, which has a value of I'd say £500 now. £200 seems to be a fair amount to invest.

Given you'd like to change the gear ratios to help you up the hills, I'm skeptic you'd be able to do that and stay within your budget. If your LBS needs to change chainrings and/or cassette, probably £200 is not going to be enough. Anyways, see what your LBS say and how much they quote for the work.

If you're looking for a bike around £1000 that is a ton of value for money, I'd look at the Boardman adv8.9 (2021 model). Great bike, sturdy, awesome specs, low gearing that will take you up every climb (48-32 at the front and 11-36 at the back). Not sure how easy it is to source one of them at the moment but it's a great great option :okay:
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
Given you'd like to change the gear ratios to help you up the hills, I'm skeptic you'd be able to do that and stay within your budget. If your LBS needs to change chainrings and/or cassette, probably £200 is not going to be enough. Anyways, see what your LBS say and how much they quote for the work.
You're probably right.

I don't know what is currently on the bike. A mate of mine had an early aluminium Defy with a triple. But I think they also came with 50/34 doubles.

One cool option could be a subcompact chainset, which could give real stump-puller hill climbing gears. And you're unlikely to get that on an off-the-shelf bike. But if it has a triple then it could just need new chainrings.

It's up to the OP to do the sums but I'd guess at a new chainset, BB, Cassette, Cables, Brake blocks, headset, chain, labour coming in at about £400. About £100 of which I'd guess at labour. That's wildly finger in the air, could be a bit more. Say £500.

Personally, I wouldn't use the current value of the bike as a guide to whether to sink more money into it. I'd use how much you like the bike. If you're really happy with it, then you'd be getting a revitalised bike that you know and love, for half the price of a new one. But all options are valid.

DIY installation is an option if you happen to enjoy that kind of thing, have the facilities, tools and time. But it could involve investment in a load of tools you'd rarely, if ever, use again and will be unable to find if/when you do actually want to use them ;) Plus there is always the risk of it All Going Horribly Wrong or buying The Wrong Damn Thing (I have personal experience of both) It's something we have argued back and forth endlessly on here.
 
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mustang1

Guru
Location
London, UK
Ooh! For a £grand, I'd get a new groupset and new wheels plus tyres and bar tape. Or, keep your frameset and wheels, then just swap everything else (saddle, bars, groupset, tyres, pedals). That Giant frame you have is very good and oh so upgradeable. I think you could get that all done in including labour cost for £1000 and you'll really feel that upgrade.

But if you really want a new bike, then I guess you need to spend more than £1000 to get a bike that's better than your Defy. Probably at least double the price to get any significant upgrade worth noticing. The other thing is a downgrade, just get a £1k bike. Having something new might be an upgrade in it's own right. But I'm going all over the place now, i reckon the best thing is new groupset/wheels/tyres/pedals/bar tape.
 
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