Retraining/Job change later in life

With various events this past year, changes in the world and my job I have been considering a change of direction. Wondered if anyone had retrained later in life for a new job and what they did ?
Looked at various options, stuff like the BT Openreach retraining but wondered if any other ideas or experiences people may have.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Considered for a while it after retiring at 47, but...

Would get absolutely spanked for income tax with my oension and other bits coming in. Starting on a new boys wage and being taxed 40% on every pound earned wouldn't have left enough to make the effort worthwhile.

Didn't fancy the idea of what the military call 'age in grade', ie, being in at the ground floor and starting again with the 20 year olds

Did think about it for a while though, and thought about doing some kind of engineering training to go with my postgrad and then try to get into aerospace at some level, but in the end opted against it.

Would be genuinely interest to hear from anyone who did it and thrived though.
 
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Tripster

Guest
Thanks @Drago . The positive & negative would be great to hear. Im sure its worked for some and not others. The tax issue wont effect me like you ^_^ but I am a similar age to when you considered it
 
I was an aircraft engineer in the RAF for 25 years.

About 10 years before I left, I started training myself as a software developer, mainly with the Open University.

Since leaving the RAF I’ve worked as a software developer, initially full time, changed to a 4-day week in 2010 and for the last three years since age 55 have moved down to a 3-day week.

I could retire, but actually really enjoy my work/life balance working Mon-Wed then the rest of the week off. Keeps the brain from turning to mush and, to be honest with my two kids in their early twenties the extra cash comes in handy to help with house deposits, cars etc.

Software development was a good choice really, as there are plenty of well-paid jobs out there. It is also easy to work from home in the current climate. There is a downside though. Software development is constantly evolving and the older you get, the harder it becomes to learn new things.

Keeps me sharp though. :smile:
 
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Tripster

Guest
About 10 years before I left, I started training myself as a software developer, mainly with the Open University.
I have looked at OU courses recently and a few years ago, maybe more, was surprised how expensive they are. The time always worried me a bit with them, not just time to completion but also find time with current job to do the course work. Im pretty poor with software too:laugh:. Sounds a positive for you though and worked out well ? Did you find it easier retraining whilst still serving in the RAF ? Did they offer help in any way or did you purely do it yourself ?
 
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Tripster

Guest
Yes. I agree that the OU is expensive, as is all university education nowadays. Fortunately the RAF paid for it all. It always surprised me how few serving airmen took advantage of the education grants available..

Also managed to wangle a six week Microsoft Certification course in Cape Town as my resettlement training just before leaving. :becool:
Deservedly so ! The support of RAF would help a lot with retraining. Unfortunately not an option for me but great to hear of a positive outcome
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
The OU was very good value when I was with them 2 decades ago, but they've jumped on the tuition fees bandwagon and ratcheted the prices up incredibly.

With so many universities offering online learning and virtual lectures due to the pandemic, and the increase in Uni's doing distance learning courses, I think the OU has not only priced itself out of the market but has also moved itself into territory with a lot of competition. Not a good move for either them or the students. It certainly put me off trying for their doctorate programme, so its lost them at least one customer and I'm sure I'm not alone.
 
I changed career in my 30s. It was IT - I brought my own computer and learned how to use it. I stayed in my existing job - but as my knowledge grew, more and more people started requesting my assistance - which increased my knowledge further.

Self funded a part time degree- did Microsoft and Novell certification- my salary was going through the roof. Maybe it was too much too soon - as anxiety and depression kicked in and I had to quit a series of well paid jobs.

Still think IT is a good area to retrain in - it's not the gravy train it once was - but you don't need much to bag a basic help desk job - and take it from there.
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
At 44 years of age I left banking ,sold my house and moved to Denmark to become a sail maker. I had never sailed and knew nothing about sail making. I just fancied a change. I did not have bags of money. I have never been afraid of changing jobs. I have no qualifications but I think I can apply myself and work hard. I have always had the opinion that if you do not like what you are doing, stop and do something else. You need more conviction than luck.
 

oldworld

Senior Member
The OU was very good value when I was with them 2 decades ago, but they've jumped on the tuition fees bandwagon and ratcheted the prices up incredibly.

With so many universities offering online learning and virtual lectures due to the pandemic, and the increase in Uni's doing distance learning courses, I think the OU has not only priced itself out of the market but has also moved itself into territory with a lot of competition. Not a good move for either them or the students. It certainly put me off trying for their doctorate programme, so its lost them at least one customer and I'm sure I'm not alone.
I think the OU today is very different from the original concept. It was meant to provide an opportunity to take a degree for people who were already in work and couldn't afford to stop working and be a full time student. All this was to be done at very low cost.
Like all education, the line between a university being a place of learning or a business has been blurred.
 
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Tripster

Guest
At 44 years of age I left banking ,sold my house and moved to Denmark to become a sail maker. I had never sailed and knew nothing about sail making. I just fancied a change. I did not have bags of money. I have never been afraid of changing jobs. I have no qualifications but I think I can apply myself and work hard. I have always had the opinion that if you do not like what you are doing, stop and do something else. You need more conviction than luck.
Nice one Steve, what a difference in job. I totally agree and wish I had changed years ago. I never liked my trade and to this day I have little interest in machining. Thankfully I diverse daily into other areas and dont machine too much now. The world is changing and potentially will force a change for me. I think manual, hands on work is the area I am considering. Im average at best at IT and the only boat I will go near is the ferry to IOM TT races ^_^
 

vickster

Legendary Member
I’m sure there was a long thread a few years ago of someone who retrained as a nurse in his 40s...there are bursaries so might be something to look into?
I think @13 rider works for openreach?
 
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Location
Kent Coast
I left a bank in my mid 40s after 27 years, and got an "office admin" job at a local company. Part of the role was to manage stock coming and going from a warehouse, and I ended up doing fork lift truck training so I could shift stuff around in the warehouse without having to borrow a fork lift and operator from elsewhere on site.
 
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Tripster

Guest
I’m sure there was a long thread a few years ago of someone who retrained as a nurse in his 40s...there are bursaries so might be something to look into?
I think @13 rider works for openreach?
Thanks Vickster, maybe he will drop in and give his opinion on working for them. Special people nurses, my mum was one. Not sure I have what it takes to be one if I am honest. We are lucky they are there to care for us
 
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