Saddle Sores

Discussion in 'Training, Fitness and Health' started by Wester, 19 Apr 2010.

  1. Wester

    Wester Über Member

    How do you treat/cure them ?
     
  2. toroddf

    toroddf Guest

    The Norwegian recipe cream. The ones they are selling in the shops in the UK with the Norwegian flag. It works.

    If the saddle sore is really bad, ask your GP to give you some steroid creme. I am currently midway through a seven day cure and it seems to be working.
     
  3. ASC1951

    ASC1951 Guru

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    You avoid them. Proper padded shorts, clean and dry, and a decent saddle.
     
  4. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    Spinning = 'Quickest way to get saddle sores".

    Stop spinning.
     
  5. Rohloff_Brompton_Rider

    Rohloff_Brompton_Rider Formerly just_fixed

    the only way to cure them is rest and time off the saddle. if you really have saddle sores you probably won't be able to ride anyway (a bit like people saying they have flu until they've had proper flu, then they realize that the previous flu's were just bad colds). the best thing i found that worked was 'bag balm' from an agricultural store, it's used to stop cows udders getting sore thru mechanical milking.

    and as previously said, vaseline to stop chaffing, sudocream or savlon to treat after a shower. personal hygiene is a must. believe me, once you have had them you don't want them again. mine was caused by hotspotting on the brompton saddle. i'd used it for approx 2300 miles then it started giving me saddle sores.
     
  6. Globalti

    Globalti Legendary Member

    It's also possible that your saddle is set too high, meaning you are rocking your pelvis to reach the pedals. Normally the pelvis should be pretty static on the saddle.
     
  7. Sysagent

    Sysagent "The Most Annoying Man In The World."

    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=A0248

    That's what the professionals use ^

    When my current pot of Assos creme runs out I will be giving it a whirl...

    As above says make sure you keep it all clean, don't cut costs on padded shorts and make sure your bike fit is correct.
     
  8. Globalti

    Globalti Legendary Member

    Why do you say this? Is it because of the potential bad posture on the saddle or the fact that you are sweating on the same saddle as hundreds of others? I'd have thought this would be a quick route to getting a spotty botty.
     
  9. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    Every time your crank goes round, a little bit of heat and a few mm3 of sweat come out of the skin round your arse.
    There is movement between inner thigh and saddle which must cause a heating effect through friction.

    Add it all up in movements per minute and of course, there are more movements per minute when spinning than when the cranks are pedalled slowly.

    The heat and sweat from muscular activity will be the same as the power output of your legs is the same, BUT, the friction generated heat will be greater with the more frequent movements.


    I have ridden with several cycling clubs and the vast majority of wise cyclists slow their pedalling rate ( cadence in modern tech-speak ) whenever the opportunity arises to reduce the heat generation between shorts and saddle.

    Curiously, it is mainly the younger members who suffer from saddle soreness, and they are the same guys who insist on spinning at 90+ rpm everywhere.
     
  10. MacB

    MacB Lover of things that come in 3's

    Depending on location and cause it may be possible to continue riding, I had a problem that had an offline saddle as the root cause, though other factors contributed. From painful experience I can vouch for the fact that 'usual' levels of hygiene will not help shift it and allow you to continue to ride. Though when the main lump reaches egg sized proportions and then bursts, there is a significant sense of relief associated with the release of pressure:ohmy:

    Step 1 - saddle set up correctly, height, fore and aft position and tilt - plus make sure the saddle isn't too wide/narrow for your bum.

    Step 2 - make yourself so clean that someone could eat their dinner off of down there:biggrin: - I commuted a 40 mile round trip daily and resorted to - get up in morning and wash crotch area thoroughly, put on clean bib shorts with plenty of cream, cycle to work, shower and apply savlon cream after shower, journey home again use of wet wipes then chamois cream and another clean pair of bib shorts, shower on arriving home and use cortisone cream after. Clean boxers during day and again in evening.

    What you can do, cycling wise, while it's healing, will also depend on personal tolerance thresholds. The above worked for me but the first week of treatment saw no shortage of blood and pus, on the bib shorts chamois, each day. There's also the fact that the undercarriage does toughen up over time, this was early on in my return to cycling.
     
  11. ewww cheers for that Macb,i've just been put right off my dinnerxx(
    Only ever had slight problems with saddle sores which went pretty quickly once i got into a proper routine of keeping clean and applying sudocreme.
     
  12. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    Blimey McB...

    I jump out of bed, visit the lavvy and wipe with toilet tissue. Pull on shorts and ride 14 miles to work.
    After work, I visit the lavvy and just give a wipe with toilet tissue before pulling shorts on to ride the 14 miles ( or further if I'm feeling energetic ) home.

    Some trips are 20 miles to Wolverhampton. I stand around eating and chatting to the chaps in Fred Williams for an hour.
    Then I go on a tour of the Fitness Firsts in the West Mids for a coffee in each before home.

    Never needed creams or potions ( except in the old days when shorts patches were real chamois leather ).

    I ride Audax 100s and 200s. I simply do the 'lavvy visit' before the ride and go. By the first control, shorts are soaking with sweat so I do the 'lavvy visit' at each control. No creams or ointments,,,,
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice