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Shoes, How long do they last?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by walker, 11 Sep 2007.

  1. walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    I have a pair of time RXE shoes that I've had for about 2 years and done about around 5000 miles. Lately everytime I ride more than 60 miles my feet really start to ache, and The pain last for a good few hours after getting out of the saddle.

    Should I start thinking about getting a new pair of shoes or should I just consider thinking about getting new padding in the soles?
     
  2. TheDoctor

    TheDoctor Man-Machine Staff Member

    Location:
    Stevenage
    I'd try some new inner soles first. Couple of pounds from Woolworths (that well known purveyor of cycling goods!)
     
  3. Hmmm, interesting one.

    I run and am (acutely, in more than one sense !) aware of the lifespan of a running shoe, because you end-up with more injuries if you carry-on using the shoes.

    'Worn-out' running shoes might actually look perfect, it's not because there's a hole in the sole or the uppers are scruffy, they're 'worn out' when the cushioning capacity of the sole degrades, the anti-overpronation/supination features break-down, etc.

    How long this takes depends on your weight, running gait, usage (concrete/tarmac/track/offroad/etc) but might be say 500 miles, more for heavyweight high-mileage trainers, less for super-lightweight running flats.

    But road cycling shoes don't have any cushioning in them.
    In fact, very much the opposite, they have carbon or fibre-glass soles which are designed to be very rigid so as to not compress, to transfer all your power to the pedals, not to 'squidge' with every pedal stroke.

    So how does a cycling shoe 'wear-out' ?
     
  4. OP
    OP
    walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    it becomes Flexible rather than being as stiff as it used to be, as with a running shoe, it's the opposite and it gets softer rather than getting harder, So the power you transfer through the shoe, some of it gets lost in the flexing of the sole.

    But What I don't know is how long should the shoe last over time, the soles are not Carbon Fibre so are relatively not so stiff and hold their shape as well.
     
  5. monnet

    monnet Über Member

    How long does a cycling shoe last? that's a tough one. Depends on the shoe, I suppose. I had my last pair (diadora, nylon sole) for about ten years although there were quite a few 'light' years in there - heavy use would have wrecked them much sooner. My old man is much more dedicated than me (about 6000 miles a year) and his carbon composite vittoria's have lasted him ten years too. Either way each pair of shoes has lasted well over 5000 miles.

    When I finally changed mine this year I didn't have any aches and pains, i could just feel that I was losing masses of power through the flex of the sole. Before making any rash purchases I'd make sure that everything else on the bike is ok. Has your postion changed slightly (ie: the way you sit on the bike - are you sitting further forward/ back etc)? How new are your cleats? Replacing them and/or the insoles might make a difference. Have the cleats worked loose and slipped (a problem I had due to the screw threads in the shoe wearing)?

    What I've learnt in replacing my shoes is that it is the worst aspect of owning a bike. New shoes can be a pig to set up right unless you get the exact same model as your last pair, and even then....Avoid buying new shoes if you can but if you do decide it's the shoes make sure you buy the absolute best you can - that way they should last longer, and more importantly you won't have to set up another pair for a long time!
     
  6. OP
    OP
    walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    Monnet, Great advice.
    The cleats I have at the moment are not that old due to my last pair snapping, so they are pretty new. the position on the bike hasn't changed in the last year so shouldn't be that.

    thing is my feet only ache after about 50-60+ miles, anything under that and I'm fine.
     
  7. Twenty Inch

    Twenty Inch New Member

    Location:
    Behind a desk
    I'm going to keep saying "Plantar Fasciitis" until you all know it by heart.

    I bet that if you get off your bike at miles 20, 30 and 40 to stretch your calf muscles, you won't get the foot pain. Let me know though - I'm happy to be proven wrong.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    walker

    walker New Member

    Location:
    Bromley, Kent
    True, But why would I want to get off my bike every 10 miles?
     
  9. Twenty Inch

    Twenty Inch New Member

    Location:
    Behind a desk
    Um, so that your calves don't cramp and your feet don't hurt??

    In other words, I don't think it's about your shoes.