Sinner Comfort Trike

a.twiddler

Über Member
Here are some pics of the Sinner Comfort trike I acquired recently.

It has some interesting features. It has a two stage drive with a chain to a Nexus 7 hub gear then another chain from a sprocket bolted to the body of the hub gear to the rear axle. The rear axle drives both wheels through a double freewheel system theoretically giving drive even if one wheel slips, unlike a differential or single wheel drive system. The height of the hub gear suggests that if fitted with a derailleur system hub the changer arm would be kept higher off the ground than you would expect with a small wheeled bike. Bottom gear works out at about 26" which doesn't seem low enough to me. The Linear is 17.5" approximately.

It has a double chainwheel on the front, but no changer or conventional post. The square protrusion behind the chainwheel looks as if it's designed to hold something, maybe a post for a light or computer, or maybe a custom derailleur post.

The frame is aluminium, the fork is steel. It has rubber block rear suspension. I've fitted a chain tensioner using an existing rear derailleur mounting point to make it easier to adjust the pedal to seat distance without having to mess about with the chain and eventually to fit some sort of front changer. The main frame and boom are a box section but unusually are rotated 90 degrees so the angles are made a visual feature. The mudguards are narrow but are substantially made. It doesn't feel particularly heavy to me but I'm not a weight weenie.

The seat came with some custom made rods so it can be mounted a bit more upright. I've tried it in the lower position but didn't get on with the supplied headrest, which is necessary at the lower angle so I'll use it like this until/unless I find a more suitable headrest.

The lot is finished in a cheerful tomatoey red.

It came with a rear frame extension and a large cargo box but I've left those off for now until I've finished fiddling with it.

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Brakes are what look like old school BMX type twin pivot caliper brakes by Saccom. I hope that they will be at least as effective as the Dia Compe Big Dog on the rear of my Linear.

Just got to sort out a mirror and some lights before I do a test run.
 
Not seen that patricular brand before. In fact, quite rare to see a delta of any type really - can count on one finger how many I've seen in person. I've heard they can feel a bit 'tippy' sometimes, but I'm guessing you're not planning to break any speed records :okay:
 
Looks really nice. The square tubing means that there’s no problem with alignment. I rode my first Kettwiesel for quite a while wondering why the front wheel seemed canted to one side before the penny dropped!

That upright stub looks like it might be for a computer mount - wrong way round for a front mech.
 
OP
a.twiddler

a.twiddler

Über Member
Not seen that patricular brand before. In fact, quite rare to see a delta of any type really - can count on one finger how many I've seen in person. I've heard they can feel a bit 'tippy' sometimes, but I'm guessing you're not planning to break any speed records :okay:
Sinner are probably better known for velomobiles. It's unusual for a Delta being lowish (23" seat height) and compact. I suppose in bike terms it's more of a compact LWB design, relatively narrow track too. It's actually an inch or two narrower than my Linear (widest point across the handlebars).

Since I've been riding a recumbent I've seen three others, two trikes and a SWB bike on the road, and both trikes have been Tadpoles. They have all been fleeting glimpses. I haven't come across another Delta, or even another LWB bike yet.
 
A two wheel Sinner was nearly my first recumbent, but I couldn’t quite afford the combined price and shipping at the time. I still like their unique looks. I read somewhere the owner chose the brand name because everyone was looking askance at his recumbents and made him feel like a sinner!
Was it Sinner or Ketweisel that had an arrangement whereby you could remove the front wheels of the trikes and connect them together in a road train -scary for the one at the back cornering at any speed!
 
OP
a.twiddler

a.twiddler

Über Member
A two wheel Sinner was nearly my first recumbent, but I couldn’t quite afford the combined price and shipping at the time. I still like their unique looks. I read somewhere the owner chose the brand name because everyone was looking askance at his recumbents and made him feel like a sinner!
Was it Sinner or Ketweisel that had an arrangement whereby you could remove the front wheels of the trikes and connect them together in a road train -scary for the one at the back cornering at any speed!
Kettweisel made it it a feature of their advertising that you could fit an adapter to the rear of their trikes and by removing the front wheel of the connected one, ride them in tandem. They claimed that you could connect a whole series of them and make a sort of "road train." I wouldn't be surprised to find a video on Youtube, though I haven't seen it myself. I've not seen one Kettweisel in the metal yet, so to see a procession of them connected together would be quite a spectacle.
 

Time Waster

Senior Member
I once saw a tandem recumbent trike. Before I got interested in recumbents so I didn't pay attention to what it was. Might have been a 4 wheeler or 5. I only remember seeing two low down seats and thinking that must be hairy at speeds.

Saw a two wheeled recumbent tandem in Belgium 3 years ago when touring. Looked around for likely owners but the upmarket coffee shop out was outside of had only roadies I had seen get off their solo road bikes. Was impressive and quite long compared to upright tandems.
 

Wobbly John

Veteran
There was a UK importer for Sinner in the early - mid '90s, as I remember him bringing some to the Mildenhall rally.
 

byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
Not seen that patricular brand before. In fact, quite rare to see a delta of any type really - can count on one finger how many I've seen in person. I've heard they can feel a bit 'tippy' sometimes, but I'm guessing you're not planning to break any speed records :okay:
I can't speak for the Sinner but my Kettweisel, which has canted rear wheels, is as stable as my old Trice QNT and Catrike Trail. This despite my backside being 10" higher compared to these tadpoles.
 
Kettweisel made it it a feature of their advertising that you could fit an adapter to the rear of their trikes and by removing the front wheel of the connected one, ride them in tandem. They claimed that you could connect a whole series of them and make a sort of "road train." I wouldn't be surprised to find a video on Youtube, though I haven't seen it myself. I've not seen one Kettweisel in the metal yet, so to see a procession of them connected together would be quite a spectacle.
Hase used to have an owner’s day at their factory and one year went for the “record“ of how many Ketts they could string together. I think in the end it was something like 88 and they did actually manage to ride it round the town! Must have been a headache repatriating all those front wheels though!

We used to have two Kettwiesels and ran them in tandem (I still have the tandem hitch though I regret selling the older Kett 😢). There was a bit of shunt in the hitch at times but otherwise it worked well. My wife and I also prefer different cadences so I could spin away merrily whilst she mashed away slowly 😆. We now have an early-ish Lepus in the garage with two 26” rear wheels and it can be hooked up to the rear of my Kett without difficulty: though as it is a slightly more tippier beast (surprisingly less than you’d thin though) cornering has to be done a bit more carefully than riding solo.

There’s no reason you couldn’t link up different manufacturer‘s trikes, the tandem hitch basically is a dummy hub that receives the front forks of the trailing machine. I’ve seen Ketts and Greenspeed Anuras linked up this way. You could even fit a 20” wheel upright trike (though you’d lose the brakes as most such machines have two front brakes)
 
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