Some advice please

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
There must be other peeps out there who have fallen and hurt their back.
I managed to do that twice in October, not bike related tho'.

At first it got better, then just before Christmas got worse and has been getting worse ever since. I saw a Doctor immediately the trouble started, then just before Christmas, last week and again today.

As well as a sharp pain in my right hip and just below the ribs at the back on the right, pain is spreading everywhere. Particularly shoulders, back of the neck, knees and ankles. I have been seeing a Chiropractor, and the Doctor does not think that this has made things worse. Is this normal for pain to extend like this? The painkillers I have been given, three different sorts now, have done nothing to ease the pain, and have made my asthma much much worse. Before this was well under control. I also have a bad headache all the time.

At the risk of upsetting people with strong views on the subject, I politely explained to the Doctor today, that I am in too much pain to be put on a waiting list, and would like to get referred to an expert asap.

If I see a back pain specialist, or whatever the word is, will they be able to tell if the pain is part of another illness. Back pain and abdominal pain seem to appear as symptoms of a lot of illnesses. Would going swimming help? If I lie or sit and do nothing will that make things worse? I have tried asking these questions of the Doctors, but they seem reluctant to offer any deffinite advice. Lots of people on here seem to have experience of similar things, what did you find helpful?
 

freakhatz

New Member
Yep, I managed to fracture a back vertebrae between my shoulder blades and 3 neck vertebrae in a fall also in October. Very ouch..

WRT your situation, I'd say that I spent 5 weeks in a neurosurgical unit where I saw a great number of back sufferers come and go. From what I saw, it was obvious that even people with serious need of treatment can end up waiting a long time because their GPs can't be arsed to put on a bit of pressure to get them seen to. Other GPs see the patient and call an ambulance; in one case it was their chiropractor who refused to touch their injury and called the ambulance - they had a protruding disc IIRC.

My impression was that it can be very important not to let back problems go undiagnosed as they can lead to worse problems, and you are absolutely right to make yourself heard and get a referral.

On the positive side, it was amazing how people who'd endured bad pain for months were quickly treated once they arrived apparently very successfully.
 

domtyler

Über Member
No specific advice other than to put as much pressure on your GP for a referral as you can. Give him or her such a hard time that they will do anything to get you off their back. You have a right to free health care and you need to make sure that you get it, you're no use to us in the Tea Shop if you can't even lift a kettle! :smile::biggrin:
 
OP
Speicher

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
Yes I would hope I have a right to free health care, but I am not prepared to wait three months to be seen. If it continues to get worse at this rate I could be house bound in a month's time.

There are plenty of peeps who visit Tea? and they are all capable of putting the kettle on, aren't they. :smile:
 

LLB

Guest
Back specialist = Osteopath (not Chiro). I've been using them for years, and they always get me back on my feet when all else fails.

GPs will only refer to physio who just offer various exercises or prescribe painkillers. Most of the pain a few weeks down the line is muscular spasms the body produces to immobilise the injury site, not the injury itself.
 
OP
Speicher

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
linfordlunchbox said:
Back specialist = Osteopath (not Chiro). I've been using them for years, and they always get me back on my feet when all else fails.

GPs will only refer to physio who just offer various exercises or prescribe painkillers. Most of the pain a few weeks down the line is muscular spasms the body produces to immobilise the injury site, not the injury itself.
Muscular spasms were mentioned. But I had not realised that they were to immobilise the injury site. However carefully I listen to the people I have consulted, it is very easy to get confused, forget what is said. Thank you for that reminder. Osteopath was the word I was trying to recall.
 

LLB

Guest
I am good friends with an osteopath (my osteopath). If you are looking to see one, I could ask him to recommend one in your locality as they all know each other through their society. He (like all the good ones) is a very busy man.

This is lifted from his website:-


What happens when I visit the Osteopath?



When you book an appointment at either of our practices we want you to feel totally at ease. In most cases, when someone goes anywhere for the first time, they feel a little apprehensive. When that same person is also in a degree of pain, and discomfort as well, they usually become tense. We are fully aware of this, and strive to make your visit as pleasant as possible. Lets take you through the process………………………………….

You’ve made the appointment. You arrive and knock on the door, where upon you are met and invited in. Once in the treatment/consultation room, you are made comfortable. Then a full case history is taken of your present, and any past conditions. This is extensive and covers all aspects of your life, including past injuries, surgery, medication etc… Assuming that no additional investigations are required at this stage (such as x-rays, or MRI) the treatment programme can be initiated. This begins with a physical examination. Most people prefer to wear loose fitting light cloths for this. You may be asked to perform some simple active movements, followed by some similar passive movements which the osteopath initiates. This starts to build a picture as to the sort, and severity of your complaint. The osteopath will probably focalise some movements, and from this will then talk you through the various treatment options. You are heavily involved in this process, as the treatment programme can only succeed if you are able to work together.


Please note, we welcome chaperones for anyone who is nervous. All minors require a parent or guardian to be present with them in the treatment room

Treatment itself can involve any/or combinations of techniques, some of which are listed here :-

Long lever articulation, using limbs, and head and neck
Short lever articulation, more focused in on individual joints
Soft tissue massage
Slow release techniques placing joints gently in positions of least tension
High velocity thrusts, using low amplitude high speed, short range movements to release latent tension between joint surfaces
Cranio-sacral work releasing bony pressure overlying the meninges (membranes encapsulating the brain and spinal cord)

Following your initial treatment session you may experience some discomfort. This can be due to the local release of lactic acid from over tight muscles, as well as the altered tension of other muscle groups within the body as a whole. Therefore we advise that you try to allow yourself time for the body to settle, as well as make this process easier for you by ensuring you drink sensible quantities of water, don’t slouch, take extra rest whilst your body adjusts to the changes. Most people find that by following the advice you are given during your treatment, that they experience very little discomfort, and only comment on their improvement. Your osteopath will tailor each visit to best suit you. In order to do this successfully you must give honest feedback.
Usually most people require several visits to resolve their problem. During each visit your case history will be updated, and treatment may be modified to better suit your requirements. You are likely to be given advice on lifestyle issues as well, and you will be encouraged to ask questions regarding any of these matters during your time with us.
 

Danny

Legendary Member
Location
York
linfordlunchbox said:
Back specialist = Osteopath (not Chiro). I've been using them for years, and they always get me back on my feet when all else fails.
Not sure why you say back specialist = Osteopath (not Chiro). Chiropractic treatment is all about the back - indeed chiropractors believe other health problems can be related to back problems.

While I'm not sure I buy into the whole chiropractic view of health, I can say that and mine has successfully helped me get over serious lower back problems on several occasions, and has also shown me how to look after my back better so that (touch wood) I have had no major problems for a few years.

I've nothing against osteopaths, and know many people who swear by them, and from what I know they and chiropractors will offer similar treatment for back problems. My suggestion would be to ask around and get recommendations of who is good locally. In particular you want someone who is going to take the time to correctly diagnose what the underlying problem is so that they can then provide you with appropriate treatment.
 
OP
Speicher

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
The person I have been referred to is a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, and apparently his department are usually quick to reply to referrals.

Thank you to people for advice on this thread. All very useful and helpful.
I will continue to read it if anyone suggests anything else.
 
OP
Speicher

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
User76 said:
I had an operation in Frenchay Neuro-Surgical unit on the 12th of January. I had developed a large protruding disc at L4/L5, the symptoms were horrific. Excrutiating pain in my hip and complete loss of power and sensation below my right knee, loss of sensation of wanting to go to the toilet, loss of hair on my right shin(!!!!!). I had been to the GP previously, and, well, er if you need any diazepam, naproxen, diclofenac, gabapentin, paracetamol or tramadol, then I'm your man.

I was rushed in by ambulance in the middle of the night, with a suspected "cord-equina". Good luck getting it sorted, keep insisting.
Did this occur on its own, or had you had any accidents in the previous few days. I have reduced power and sensation in both legs, loss of sensation when on the toilet, and reduced hair on one leg. The Chiropractor did not detect anything major, except that my hips, (pelvis) were out of alignment, making one leg "longer" than the other, one shoulder higher than the other. Could this mis-alignment be due to compensating for a much older injury?
 
Speicher said:
Did this occur on its own, or had you had any accidents in the previous few days. I have reduced power and sensation in both legs, loss of sensation when on the toilet, and reduced hair on one leg. The Chiropractor did not detect anything major, except that my hips, (pelvis) were out of alignment, making one leg "longer" than the other, one shoulder higher than the other. Could this mis-alignment be due to compensating for a much older injury?
Those are also the more severe end of the symptoms of sciatica. When I went to the docs with back pain a few years ago he asked me all of those questions: ie do you have reduced power in your legs, pins and needles/numbness, problems with bladder and bowel control and so on. I asked him why he needed to know and his reply was 'sciatica'.
 
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