Touring recipes?

longers

Veteran
I did a small B&B tour this year and will be trying some camping touring next year for the first time.

I know it's a long way off but I'm thinking about what to eat ;).
What's easy to carry, easy to cook, tasty and nutritious while on the bike? One effort will hopefully be a fortnight so I might need a few meal ideas.

Over to you. :smile:
 
I always try to shop every day on tour, but I always found it useful to have a couple of Pasta n Sauce type sachet meals on board. They weigh nothing and take up no room and if you don't get chance to go shopping you can always eat!
 

Elmer Fudd

Miserable Old Bar Steward
What about the dehydrated stuff mountaneers use ? Tastes crap but you could always stick a goldfish bowl on your head, hum Space Oddity and pretend you are a spaceman in your tent shaped space module.
(For here am I sitting on my billy can,
Loos so far away,
Planet Earth is blue,
And I've nothing but this stew.....)
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
longers said:
I did a small B&B tour this year and will be trying some camping touring next year for the first time.

I know it's a long way off but I'm thinking about what to eat ;).
What's easy to carry, easy to cook, tasty and nutritious while on the bike? One effort will hopefully be a fortnight so I might need a few meal ideas.

Over to you. :smile:
Carbs from:

Instant mash, cous cous, 5 minute pasta, pitta bread, malt loaves, porridge, sugar

Protein from:

Dried soya, corned beef, tinned mackerel, pates, cheese, cooked meets

Quick comfort from: cuppa soups, tea, dried milk, coffee, tinned stews/ savouries

Instant gratifiication from: fish and chips, supermarkets' all day breakfasts, cake shops.

Supplemented with fruit.

However in France, diet through the day quickly became bread, cheese, pate, red wine, lots of local fruit and a cassoulet for supper with the odd foray into a pattisserie where the pastries vied for my attention and three or four tended to be successful in their quest.



Stodge
 

Bigtallfatbloke

New Member
I managed pretty well I thought On my Trangia 27. The trick I found was to get organised....and carry a lid for the pans & a basic stash on died herbs, salt & pepper and chile powder..

One of my fav meals in the tent was my own version of beef stroganoff, except i used chicken instead!

I used all fresh ingrediants, garlic, onions, chicken rice, flour, cream fesh, salt pepper, herbs, olive oil etc...and it was yummy.

There are loads of things you can cook on a small stove...be adventurous and dont just go with the bangers and mash etc...I cooked a few 'practice' meals on the stove at home before I left.
 

Danny

Legendary Member
Location
York
Agree with BFTB that you can cook a lot of interesting things on a small stove.

However the key to a good meal is to find a campsite by a cold stream so you can chill a bottle of wine or a beer while your meal is cooking.
 
OP
longers

longers

Veteran
Thanks for the advice, I'll just be doing what I do at home then. Make it up out of stuff that's good for me, filling, fattening, tasty and cheap (all five foodgroups covered). Dannyg's advice is very good.

Raybo? Are you sure? The first recipe I found was for cooked worms and the second was Crappie Grill? Crappie balls was the third recipe. :blush::wacko::tongue:
 
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