Tyre width

Dark46

Veteran
When I bought my hybrid it came with 700x37 tyres. I need to get some new ones, and as I'm doing more road riding than anything else. Can I fit 700x28 road tyres on the same rims?
 

Rickshaw Phil

Overconfidentii Vulgaris
Moderator
Probably, but to be sure you need to know the rim width which should be marked on the rim somewhere, if not it's a case of taking the tyre off and measuring the inside faces of the rim.

Then check it against the chart in the "which tyre fits which rim?" section on the Schwalbe site: http://www.schwalbe.com/gb/reifenmasse.html which will let you know how narrow you can safely go.:thumbsup:
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
I should think it will be ok, bear in mind too that these days the trend on road bikes is towards wider rims, by the same logic, you can put narrower tyres on a hybrid rim than traditionally would have been advised for that rim.
 

sreten

Well-Known Member
Location
Brighton, UK
Hi,

You can but it is probably not a good idea. For most fatter tyres are better,
more comfortable, last longer, go faster and resist punctures better.

rgds, sreten.
 

mythste

Veteran
Location
Manchester
Hi,

You can but it is probably not a good idea. For most fatter tyres are better,
more comfortable, last longer, go faster and resist punctures better.

rgds, sreten.
I'm certainly no seasoned pro and I'm sure Sreten has reasons for making this suggestion, but I can't help but think that "for most, fatter tyres are better" might not be entirely on point.

I'd say for road riding you'd notice a pretty good increase in speed and handling with a pair of 28's.
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
I'm certainly no seasoned pro and I'm sure Sreten has reasons for making this suggestion, but I can't help but think that "for most, fatter tyres are better" might not be entirely on point.
Define "better". I went from 32c (Vredestein Perfect Max) to 42c (Continental Comfort Contact, then Touring Plus) with little decrease in speed (if any) and a massive improvement in comfort and grip.
 

mythste

Veteran
Location
Manchester
These are worth reading on the topic;
https://janheine.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/bicycle-quarterly-performance-of-tires/

https://janheine.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/tire-width-how-much-difference-do-a-few-millimeters-make/

http://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=58

I have 23c on my "quick bike", because that's all I could get in Krylion Carbons. I prefer 25s, and if they'd fit, I'd ride on 28s.
That has indeed made for some interesting reading.

Would you encounter any reduction in durability following the findings in those articles do you think?
 

MrGrumpy

Huge Member
Location
Fly Fifer
My new bike bought last year had 25c tyres fitted, usually ride 23c, massive difference in comfort and not one deflation in nearly 3000 miles. My winter bike has 23c fitted and its harsh in comparison, I might be able to squeeze 25c on but it is very tight clearence. Hence my next C2W bike will be better in respect to full mudguard compatibiity and slightly bigger tyres.
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
Would you encounter any reduction in durability following the findings in those articles do you think?
I've not noticed any difference. I've p*ed both Comfort Contact, and Touring Plus, in both cases in circumstances I doubt a thinner tyre would have stood up to either (6" nail, 6" phillips head screw) so it's probably not fair to draw conclusions either way. I think Grant, from Rivendell, reckons a big, lower pressure tyre is kinder to your wheels (more cushioning, so less stress through bumps &c).
 

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
I am a big fan of the slightly larger tyre ie 25 v 23 but another thing to consider is the weight of the tyre, once up to speed a heavier bigger tyre is more comfortable & rolls just as well as the lighter tyre, but the lighter weight tyre will accelerate quicker,
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
I am a big fan of the slightly larger tyre ie 25 v 23 but another thing to consider is the weight of the tyre, once up to speed a heavier bigger tyre is more comfortable & rolls just as well as the lighter tyre, but the lighter weight tyre will accelerate quicker,
Continental GP4000 SII - the difference between 23 and 25c is 20 grams. (205g, 225g). 28c adds 55g (260g)

In the Comfort Contact, going from 37c to 42c adds 70 grams. (600g, 670g). (All weights from Continental's website).
 

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
Continental GP4000 SII - the difference between 23 and 25c is 20 grams. (205g, 225g). 28c adds 55g (260g)

In the Comfort Contact, going from 37c to 42c adds 70 grams. (600g, 670g). (All weights from Continental's website).
Yes very little difference, but the saying "marginal gains" springs to mind.
 
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