Wahoo Core Leg Rust

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
I don't know, but you are obviously suffering from a similar problem to what rotted my turbo trainer in one winter!

I used to get a major sweat on every session and that dripped down onto the turbo frame. I always wiped it down with a towel afterwards, but I didn't notice the sweat that had run round underneath. The salty water quickly rusted it from below.
 
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a.twiddler

Über Member
Could that be the basis of a warranty claim? Surely the manufacturer knows that people sweat when exerting themselves and the equipment should be capable of withstanding the long term effects of this.

Just a thought from someone who does not use such things but expects stuff that you buy to be fit for purpose.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
Could that be the basis of a warranty claim? Surely the manufacturer knows that people sweat when exerting themselves and the equipment should be capable of withstanding the long term effects of this.

Just a thought from someone who does not use such things but expects stuff that you buy to be fit for purpose.
If you ride your bike outdoors in the winter when the roads have been gritted and don't wash the salty crap off, the bike can pay the price pretty quickly... :whistle:

I had it happen in less than one day after I went out for a quick Christmas morning ride a few years back. I was under strict instructions to be back in time for Christmas dinner so I rushed home, and put my bike away still covered in salty grit because I didn't have time to clean it. I took the bike out into my back yard first thing on Boxing Day and discovered that the chain had rusted solid overnight!
Admittedly, in my case, the turbo trainer frame that rusted was painted so it should have been able to take a dousing in sweat. I had accidentally scratched the paintwork and that allowed the rust to start in the scratched areas.
 

a.twiddler

Über Member
If you ride your bike outdoors in the winter when the roads have been gritted and don't wash the salty crap off, the bike can pay the price pretty quickly... :whistle:


Admittedly, in my case, the turbo trainer frame that rusted was painted so it should have been able to take a dousing in sweat. I had accidentally scratched the paintwork and that allowed the rust to start in the scratched areas.
If you use your car (Assuming you countenance such things) in winter do you wash it every time you use it to stop it turning into a pile of rust flakes overnight? The tedious business of going to work gets in the way, plus dark nights, and the general business of life. Yet somehow they are designed to last ten years or more. Commuter cyclists might have something to add to this, how ever do their bikes manage to survive? Even the odd scratch on a car is sufficiently undercoated to prevent rampant rust breaking out. There may be a cost difference but the principle is the same, particularly on a trainer that never goes outside.

Winter shouldn't take people by surprise, it happens every year.

It may be December outside, but it's always August in your armpits, and hot people drip sweat. Depends how old the item in question is, but the paint and protection doesn't seem to be very good. Paint and undercoating isn't just there to make things look pretty, it's there to protect too!

(Rant mode off)
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
If you use your car (Assuming you countenance such things) in winter do you wash it every time you use it to stop it turning into a pile of rust flakes overnight?
I do NOT countenance such things! :laugh:

Modern cars are obviously a lot better than cars were a few decades ago. Cars back then actually DID turn into piles of rust flakes over just a few winters unless extra steps were taken to prevent it happening. My dad used to spray something inside all of the panels of his cars... 'Waxoil'*** (?), or something like that.

*** Ah - WAXOYL - that might be good for Wahoo Core Leg Rust treatment/prevention too?
 

a.twiddler

Über Member
I do NOT countenance such things! :laugh:

Modern cars are obviously a lot better than cars were a few decades ago. Cars back then actually DID turn into piles of rust flakes over just a few winters unless extra steps were taken to prevent it happening. My dad used to spray something inside all of the panels of his cars... 'Waxoil'*** (?), or something like that.

*** Ah - WAXOYL - that might be good for Wahoo Core Leg Rust treatment/prevention too?
Modern cars...modern consumer durables...the expectation is that they should be...durable. And this is in an age when so many things are allegedly disposable. Not like several decades ago when durability was apparently an optional extra. Perhaps the good old days weren't actually that good!
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
Perhaps the good old days weren't actually that good!
They weren't! :laugh:

I got into electronics as a teenager because electronic kit was expensive and unreliable. I couldn't afford new prices, so I would get hold of broken amps etc. free/cheap and fix them. These days, electronic devices are not only way more affordable, they are way more reliable as well. Our TVs used to go wrong a couple of times a year. These days you would expect a TV to last at least a 5 year warranty period, and you would probably replace it before it ever broke down.
 
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