What gear do you take to climb a mountain?

PaulB

Legendary Member
Location
Colne
Too much or too little?

I ask because yesterday I climbed the Eildon hills in Scotland and it was so easy, I went in T-shirt, shorts and running shoes and nowt else. I saw two groups of people who had as much gear on as you'd have for a major trek in the Alps or the Himalayas and these were two hills of about 1000ft max and no more than about 7K of distance in total. I've seen similarly-clad people round here on Pendle (1812 ft high) who looked way, way over-kitted. 45 litre rucksacks, gaiters, expensive Gore-tex XCR jackets, overtrousers, the lot! Hey, they've bought the gear and it's going to get a good airing, is it not?

My mate John, who is a big-wig at the Hope MTB production place, laughs at the kit people wear to do Munros in Scotland. He takes no rucksack and nothing more than one can of pop and a bag of sweets when he climbs them! Now that's well under-prepped for such a climb but that's going from one extreme to another in my opinion.

So, let's say a five hour outing with a total ascent of 3,245 feet, 16 degrees C at the base and 12C on the top, reasonable clarity, occasional clouds. What do YOU take on such a trek?
 

longers

Veteran
PaulB said:
What do YOU take on such a trek?
Cheese and pickle butties wrapped in tin foil.
 

TheDoctor

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe
Moderator
Location
Stevenage
Personally I'd take enough that if the weather closed in I could survive a night. So, a drink, a Mars bar / slab of Kendal mint cake / pork pie or some such, waterproofs and a fleece. I wouldn't necessarily be comfortable, but I wouldn't be dead.
 

longers

Veteran
^ that's what I take as well as the butties, enough to be comfy if something goes wrong.

There's plenty of comment made about people being unprepared as well as overprepared but it's down to you, your capabilities and sensibilities.

Taking a dog is normally high on the list as well.
 

Alan Whicker

Senior Member
TheDoctor said:
Personally I'd take enough that if the weather closed in I could survive a night. So, a drink, a Mars bar / slab of Kendal mint cake / pork pie or some such, waterproofs and a fleece. I wouldn't necessarily be comfortable, but I wouldn't be dead.
+1.

If I was going on me tod I might consider a survival blanket, too. I'm definitely not a 'can't happen to me' type. I grew up in't Pennines (on the Yorkshire side) and I know even something as simple as a sprained ankle can lead to very big trouble, even relatively close to 'civilisation'.
 
I generally wear Ronhills and a wicking top in summer, a pair of boots, lightweight'ish.

In my rucksack will be a fleece and windproof/waterproof, lunch, water and a sitmat for my arse at lunchtime :laugh: Always in there is a small first aid kit, whistle, plastic bivvy bag and a headtorch with a disconnected battery and I carry a map and compass, none of this new fangled techno wizadry.
 

BrumJim

Forum Stalwart (won't take the hint and leave...)
I sometimes wonder if I take far too much up a mountain. But it all very much depends on condition and weather. Problem is that unless you know the area well and have been looking at the weather closely, its all a bit of a lottery. Ive taken 3.5 litres of fluid (mainly water) up a mountain, and needed every drop. I've taken full waterproof trousers, jacket, gaiters up a mountain on a dry day, and needed them all. You won't need both, but can't tell. Trainers may be OK on some routes on some mountains, but sometimes walking boots are essential if you don't want to wreck your ankles. Unless you know the path - better to be safe than stretchered off.

Also, the fitter you are, the less you need to take.
 

al78

Guru
Location
Horsham
PaulB said:
So, let's say a five hour outing with a total ascent of 3,245 feet, 16 degrees C at the base and 12C on the top, reasonable clarity, occasional clouds. What do YOU take on such a trek?
Walking boots
Food and drink
Waterproofs
A spare layer in case of significant wind chill on the summit.
Map and compass
Fleece hat and gloves (if it is 16C at the base it will likely be around 6-8C at the summit)
An attractive female companion (if available) :laugh:
 

snorri

Legendary Member
PaulB said:
So, let's say a five hour outing with a total ascent of 3,245 feet, 16 degrees C at the base and 12C on the top, reasonable clarity, occasional clouds. What do YOU take on such a trek?
Not enough information provided to be able to give a guide as to what might be required.:laugh:
 

darkstar

New Member
Well it's hard to determine what a 3,245 feet could entail, but whenver i've been out fell running with my uncle, i've ran in leggings, thermal top and hat, carrying a water bottle (when it's colder) In temps of 16 shorts would be fine. Not sure about walking, never done much before.
 

bianchi1

Guru
Location
malverns
It's always better to be over prepared than under. It's not a competition anyway. Why look down on people with better kit. If you can afford it why not buy an amazing jacket for a stroll up a hill.
 

The Jogger

Legendary Member
Location
Chichester
I have done a bit of fell running and a few weeks ago I was going to wear my off road trainers for walking up a peak or two in the mournes. My BIL laughed and gave me a pair of good walking boots, I also layered up as it was cold up in the clouds, it also rained and was also warm and sunny. It was a fab day though!
 
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