What Gearing?

sean8997

MEKK Poggio 3.5 & Merida Cyclocross 3
Location
Chester
Just wondering what gearing you use, I have a 2010 Merida CC3 which has FSA 50-34t double and shimano 9spd cassette, I did the Etape Cymru on Sunday and struggled like buggery up some of the hills while others on road bikes flew past me. Anyone got recomendations for changing my gearing?
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
For the front you have the standard road bike compact gearing (50/34) set up.
What rear cassette have you got?
 
Just wondering what gearing you use, I have a 2010 Merida CC3 which has FSA 50-34t double and shimano 9spd cassette, I did the Etape Cymru on Sunday and struggled like buggery up some of the hills while others on road bikes flew past me. Anyone got recomendations for changing my gearing?
that won't be related to 'cyclocross' - or even your gearing. It will be related to your fitness.
 

jdtate101

Ex-Fatman
Most road setup's have something like a 12-25 rear as standard, which is enough for most people when combined with a compact chainset. I think the 9 speed is a 2010 tiagra model (can you confirm). If so you can get cassettes bigger (if memory serves me correctly, up to 28). Any more than 28 will require a longer rear cage and longer chain.

Find out exactly what you have....

EDIT: according to this you have a 12-25 (assuming they used the same components which is likely)

http://www.merida-bikes.com/en_gb/bike/2012/47/Cross/Cyclo+Cross+3
 
OP
sean8997

sean8997

MEKK Poggio 3.5 & Merida Cyclocross 3
Location
Chester
Think I best Get my skinny ass out on them hills a lot more then!
What i really struggled with though was when in my lowest gear it was a real struggle at times to move the pedals so more power needed in my legs!
 

VamP

Banned
Location
Cambs
If your lowest gear is 34-25 then definitely a 27 sprocket will make steeper climbs a bit less tricky, in terms of keeping going. It's unlikely to make you any faster however, except in as much it will enable you to pace yourself a little more effectively.

But yeah, riding more hills is the way forward.
 
OP
sean8997

sean8997

MEKK Poggio 3.5 & Merida Cyclocross 3
Location
Chester
Just had a look at my cassette, lowest gear is a 25, will have a look at a 27, may help my legs a little!
 

smutchin

Cat 6 Racer
Location
The Red Enclave
Well... 36x16* is the gear I used for the one cyclocross race I've done to date. ^_^

I had a few comments at the start of yesterday's race - eg "That's a brave choice" - but there weren't many places where I missed having a wider selection of gears. In fact, the gearing was pretty much spot on for that circuit, and if anything, I missed having higher gears more, as they would have been useful on the flat, fast sections of the circuit. Also, singlespeed means you have fewer things to go wrong on the bike, your bike is lighter overall, and you never risk being in the wrong gear (I passed a few people who were struggling with gear changes).

In a race, I reckon having lower gears at your disposal is a mixed blessing - if you have lower gears, you use them; if you don't have them, you're forced to push that bit harder up the banks. As others have said, your ability to get up the steep bits is more about you than the bike. There were places on yesterday's race where I was riding up steep banks that others with multi-geared bikes were getting off and carrying it up.

The only way to get good at riding up steep hills is to practise riding up steep hills.

d.

*that's about a 61" gear on 34C cross tyres.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
I would have thought the opposite of smutchin, in as much as riding single speed in a cross even you would often find yourself in the wrong gear.
 

smutchin

Cat 6 Racer
Location
The Red Enclave
I would have thought the opposite of smutchin, in as much as riding single speed in a cross even you would often find yourself in the wrong gear.
It's the singlespeed paradox: you're rarely in the right gear but never in the wrong gear.

I used to ride BMX in my youth, which probably explains a lot.

d.
 
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