What to wear

fuzzypumper85

New Member
Location
Sussex
Hi guys and girls,

I was hoping that someone could help me. I have returned to cycling after a long long time away (where I used to ride a mountain bike everywhere as a teenager). I am starting to train for a triathlon and have got a new road bike and all the clothes I need for training, however I have a question about what to wear for commuting. I have never used my bike for commuting and I have recently got a new job where I can ride all the way along the seafront in Brighton. Its very early morning starts and evening finishes and going along the coast I am expecting it to be very cold and wet. So my question is this, What do I wear to stop me freezing to death and being drowned by rain but also doesn't cause me to sweat profusely and die of heat by the time I have built up a few miles.

Many thanks for all your help

Paul
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
You'll probably need a few things and to switch them both day by day and if you get it wrong at the start. Aim to be slightly cool but not quite cold when you set off. Get things you can layer up if needed.

I'd suggest balaclava, beanie, fleece and packable waterproof for now, adding a windstopper and cycling cap once it warms up (wear instead of the fleece, not as well!) and some sun hats and light jerseys for summer. Choice of thermal to sunshine is good for other things (gloves and mitts, for example).

Aim to always allow yourself a bit of margin, so you can slow down if you overheat or go faster if you get cold. In sheltered cities, cyclists brag about how predictable their commute is, but it's not like that on exposed rides!
 
I'd not bother with waterproof per-se. In my humble opinion you're better of with one of the windproof fleece type jackets, ideally a cycling one, which are somewhat water resistant, but more importantly your own body warmth keeps you dry next to the skin if the jacket itself gets damp. eg Altura do (or did) a good hi viz one, and nicer but dearer there's the Assos 851. Mine wasn't excessively dear as there was a deal on last year's colour of some such, but still double the price of the Altura. It was twice as nice, but not twice as good if that makes sense. I'd also recommend lycra bib longs. Again you get wet but it dries out again. Thickness according to conditions. In fact I wear bib 3/4 length for 70% of the year, and shorts or full-lengths for the rest. Long socks with 3/4 length bibs are good compromise too. All this assumes you can change into something respectable once you get there. It's a bonus if you can leave kit somewhere to dry at work, rather than having to stuff it in a cupboard, but no the end of the world if you do.
 

snorri

Legendary Member
What you wear could be influenced by the manner in which you intend to cycle.
You don't say how long your commute will be and if you intend to use the commute as a component of your triathlon training programme, or will you be happy to pedal along at speed which would not increase your breathing rate.
 
OP
fuzzypumper85

fuzzypumper85

New Member
Location
Sussex
What you wear could be influenced by the manner in which you intend to cycle.
You don't say how long your commute will be and if you intend to use the commute as a component of your triathlon training programme, or will you be happy to pedal along at speed which would not increase your breathing rate.
Sorry, its an 8 mile commute each way. I don't intend on powering it the whole way but just a steady pace would be good.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
I'd not bother with waterproof per-se.
Are you sure? The wind driving the rain into you on the coast is a soaking like few others.

I probably should have said that I usually ride for work in regular-looking clothes except hats and summer jerseys. So I'm maybe less willing to get wet and accept that it'll dry again...
 
Are you sure? The wind driving the rain into you on the coast is a soaking like few others.

I probably should have said that I usually ride for work in regular-looking clothes except hats and summer jerseys. So I'm maybe less willing to get wet and accept that it'll dry again...
If you're riding in your work clothes, then I agree, you need a waterproof. If you are able to wear cycling stuff, then really I'd not bother with a waterproof but one of the better windproofy fleecy things
 

iggibizzle

Senior Member
Location
blackpool
Hello. I do similar distance right along blackpool front. I've tackled everything up to 50mph headwinds and driving rain and hail. Zero cover from sea spray and gusts. I leave my work gear at work so that's safe and dry if weather is bad. This time of year I wear a base layer, a normal long sleeved cycling top over that, and a thin shower proof jacket over that. Then longs and overshoes. Exactly same as what I wear on long weekend rides. If it's really wet on morning my cycling clothes will still be wet when I put them back on though :cold:

I like to push on a bit so soon warm up. Today is about 6degrees and was sweating quite bad. Soon be time for shorts!! :hyper:
 
OP
fuzzypumper85

fuzzypumper85

New Member
Location
Sussex
Thanks for all your help guys.
 

Madboy

Regular
I wear a good waterproof top. I have a muddyfox base layer, then if it's cold I wear a thin fleece. I then have a reflective waterproof jacket. I wear sealskinz over shoes. The biggest pain is the trousers, I wear leggings and waterproof leggings. If its 5-6 degrees you will warm up pretty quickly. The biggest problem I find is if you don't wear overshoes is that your feet get cold very quickly, well I find that anyway.
 

runner

Veteran
Location
Bristol
I wear a good waterproof top. I have a muddyfox base layer, then if it's cold I wear a thin fleece. I then have a reflective waterproof jacket. I wear sealskinz over shoes. The biggest pain is the trousers, I wear leggings and waterproof leggings. If its 5-6 degrees you will warm up pretty quickly. The biggest problem I find is if you don't wear overshoes is that your feet get cold very quickly, well I find that anyway.
Easily solved wear overshoes. They really do keep your feet warm
 
Location
Pontefract
Easily solved wear overshoes. They really do keep your feet warm
But not always dry, I have two pairs, one better than the other at keeping my feet dry, it also depends what I have on my legs, if I am wearing shorts or 3/4's chances are my feet will be wet in a heavy downpour quite quickly as the water seeps between the top elastic and my legs, if I am wear longer leggings or leg warmers they will stay dryer longer, but then some conditions I have ridden in no matter of wet weather gear will keep you dry, just aim to stay warm.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
if I am wearing shorts or 3/4's chances are my feet will be wet in a heavy downpour quite quickly
Errr yeah? Don't wear shorts in the rain if you don't like wet legs and feet. Wear long trousers and waterproof boots that channel the water outwards. Isn't this obvious? Are many those fancy cycling shoes that hook onto the pedals not waterproof then? :laugh:
 
Location
Pontefract
Errr yeah? Don't wear shorts in the rain if you don't like wet legs and feet. Wear long trousers and waterproof boots that channel the water outwards. Isn't this obvious? Are many those fancy cycling shoes that hook onto the pedals not waterproof then? :laugh:
You tried riding in a summer downpour with approx 2" of rain an hour, in trousers, seems to me you haven't ridden in anything very heavy in terms of rain, nothing is 100% in that sort of rain. The worst I have record for is a rate of 4" an hour even though it didn't last that long you get pretty wet pretty quick.
 
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