Winter Bikes

straas

Veteran
Hi all,

My quest for a winter bike continues.

Currently looking at:

Decathlon's Triban

520 https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/recreational-cycling-road-bike-triban-rc520-disc-brakes/_/R-p-308072?mc=8554421&c=BLUE&utm_source=RakutenMarketing&utm_medium=Affiliate&utm_campaign=2294204:Future+Publishing+Ltd&utm_content=10&utm_term=UKNetwork&ranMID=45219&ranEAID=kXQk6*ivFEQ&ranSiteID=kXQk6.ivFEQ-EaMnCUPKMegNSzCmbT3gew#

Well priced and includes 105 which is nice, not sure about the mechanical hybrid disc brakes and have heard mixed reports about the wheels.

Ribbles Aluminium CGR AL

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-cgr-al-orange-shimano-tiagra/

Seems like a good all rounder, but does it offer more value than the triban?

Ribbles Steel 725

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-endurance-725-disc-green-shimano-tiagra/

Probably the nicest looking of the lot (IMO)

Finding it very difficult to choose any bike. I've had a look at the 2nd hand offerings and they're pretty slim to be honest.

I don't really want to stray outside of this price point

Would appreciate any input from owners of any of the above.
 

Darius_Jedburgh

Über Member
I had a CGR, just sold it.
Get better mudguards. SKS Longboards.
The wheels died a quick death because the bearing seals are made from a Coca Cola can and invited dirt in.
Don't get cable brakes if you are doing serious riding. They work, but hydraulic are streets ahead. Arguably rim brakes are better than cable disc.

It was a good bike at a good price, but as with everything....
buy cheap, buy twice.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
The Triban offers arguably the best VfM and you get a lifetime frame warranty. I think the issue regarding getting the tyres onto the rims applies to the rim braked version.
The steel framed Ribble doesn't need the frame warranty and isn't likely to be much heavier than the Triban, also less common than the Decathlon offering and much prettier.
Over to you Mr Strass.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
The 520 is probably the best overall on a couple of criteria - it's got good mounting points for full length mudguards as well as a fork crown mount if you wanted to go with a dynamo light (highly recommended for a winter commuter) and the Hy/Rd brakes are far and away the best brakes you can get for mechanical disks. No contest.

The downside with this bike is that it has QR disc hubs - this could potentially be an issue down the line if you needed to replace the wheels, it's getting harder to find non thru-axle disc braked wheelsets now and in a couple of years you may well be looking at custom if you did need new wheels.

That being said, if I had to pick one of the three bikes, I'd go for the steel Ribble and then upgrade the brakes - it doesn't have a fork crown mount for a light but you can work around that easily enough depending on how you want to setup the bike.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
My experience of cable disk brakes by Shimano is that they work as well as good rim v brakes in the dry and continue to work like that in the wet. They are easy to maintain and need no more servicing than any other cable brake.
 

johnblack

Senior Member
Get a hardtail 29er and ride anywhere, don't much bother with the winter roadie anymore.
 
OP
S

straas

Veteran
Get a hardtail 29er and ride anywhere, don't much bother with the winter roadie anymore.
I've got a MTB, but like to get out on the lanes in the winter too.

I find rim brakes absolutely fine in the dry, but as soon as the rims get that slick black film on I completely lose confidence in braking which makes the ride unenjoyable - so I'm really looking for a more reliable brake for the wet rather than something that I can lock up in the dry if that makes sense?

I have been using a Ribble 7005 audax for winter riding, but it struggles to take 25mm tyres + mudguards and has done me a fairly good service so feel it can be sent to retirement in someone elses shed.

The Steel ribble does really appeal as they seem like frames for life, and I like the styling.
 

johnblack

Senior Member
I've got a MTB, but like to get out on the lanes in the winter too.

I find rim brakes absolutely fine in the dry, but as soon as the rims get that slick black film on I completely lose confidence in braking which makes the ride unenjoyable - so I'm really looking for a more reliable brake for the wet rather than something that I can lock up in the dry if that makes sense?

I have been using a Ribble 7005 audax for winter riding, but it struggles to take 25mm tyres + mudguards and has done me a fairly good service so feel it can be sent to retirement in someone elses shed.

The Steel ribble does really appeal as they seem like frames for life, and I like the styling.
Yeh I get it, I have a CAAD8 which has been my winter bike for years, the brakes are basically non-existant in the wet!

I don't find I lose that much speed on the 29er over the winter roadie, so do the road routes on it to, but I can cut my rides a bit shorter because the MTB is more a relentless kind of riding. The lads I ride with have basically all done the same over the past couple of years.

I do like the look of that Ribble in BRG, I'm not sure the difference between Tiagra and 105 is that big, haven't ridden either for a while, but damn the price of that TriBan is good, you could buy that and trick it up with the £250 you save.
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
Either of those Ribbles would do a sterling job, the old 7005 frames they made for years were basically a national treasure in winter terms.

I would pay a little more for the groupset upgrade and get hydro as I'm used to hydro brakes, and also 11spd compatible with my other bike/s if I need to borrow a bit.

As above, if you buy a ribble don't spec their mudguards - buy the SKS Longboard separate.
The potential issues with the wheels and need to replace would put me right off the Triban
Yep, QR disc wheels are on their way out of favour.. Maybe a while ago if my own experience recently is anything to go by
 
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Oldhippy

Senior Member
The same bike for all. My Rayleigh Royal is a workhorse and apart from touring, it pulls a trailer for big shops, panniers for small shops, day rides, to and from work every day and a great all rounder since new.
 
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