Woodrup Split Personality!

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This is my Woodrup which I have just acquired. It has a split chainstay at the moment which I am hoping can be repaired. It looks too good to scrap so I am looking into what options are available.
This morning I did an artists impression of what it would look like when built up. Look at it's sad eyes! How could I let it be scrapped?
I popped on a Campag chainring to see what the clearance between the chainring and stay was like. It doesn't look too bad but I haven't tightened it up.
The split in the chainstay cleaned up , but as I was scraping the rust off a piece fell in!

Woodrup.JPG


Wood stay.JPG


Oh dear!.JPG
 

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T4tomo

Legendary Member
as per other thread, the only option is new chainstay, there certainly isnt enough clearance for a repair sleeve even if that were desirable. . I'd go with a chrome finish so you leave the other paint work original.
 
That looks lovely @Illaveago - I do hope a fix is viable. Mind you, I *am* biased towards red bikes. :biggrin:

With my "sensible" hat on, I can see that my suggestion of a sleeve over the crack isn't going to work. There just isn't the clearance when you look at it from overhead. And as it is, simply replacing the chainstay while keeping everything else the same, is only going to give you the same problem further down the line. Once you tighten that chainset and stick a chain on it, it's just going to continue to grind away at the stay.

If the frame *is* financially viable to repair, then I would definitely look at fitting a bottom bracket with a longer spindle in order to make sure that the chain / chainrings won't foul the frame.
 
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Illaveago

Illaveago

Guru
That looks lovely @Illaveago - I do hope a fix is viable. Mind you, I *am* biased towards red bikes. :biggrin:

With my "sensible" hat on, I can see that my suggestion of a sleeve over the crack isn't going to work. There just isn't the clearance when you look at it from overhead. And as it is, simply replacing the chainstay while keeping everything else the same, is only going to give you the same problem further down the line. Once you tighten that chainset and stick a chain on it, it's just going to continue to grind away at the stay.

If the frame *is* financially viable to repair, then I would definitely look at fitting a bottom bracket with a longer spindle in order to make sure that the chain / chainrings won't foul the frame.

One way it could be sleeved would be to cut through the split and then unsolder the joint at the rear dropouts. A sleeve from a scrap frame rear stay could be inserted and brazed in . The rear stay would then have to slide over the sleeve and be brazed back together.
 
One way it could be sleeved would be to cut through the split and then unsolder the joint at the rear dropouts. A sleeve from a scrap frame rear stay could be inserted and brazed in . The rear stay would then have to slide over the sleeve and be brazed back together.

That's not called a sleeve, where the patch is on the inside. It's got a specific name, but I can't think of it right now. I do see what you're trying to do here, though.
 
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Illaveago

Illaveago

Guru
"dogs breakfast", "pigs ear" or "reet farking mess"? :okay:

@Illaveago given you have to "unsolder the joint at the rear dropouts" you might as well just braze in a new chainstay.

It was just an idea of doing a cheap repair but having seen the bike now I think I might go and get a new stay put in. I can save money by spraying it myself .
 
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Illaveago

Illaveago

Guru
Yesterday I managed to start stripping down the frame. I had managed to remove the gear levers after some liberal lubrication and cleaning of the threads before winding the screw back and forth slowly. I tried undoing the stem bolt but found that the expander was just turning. Today I will try a pair of straight bars in and see if it will twist out. I managed to remove the BB drive side cup and axle out. The non drive side is stiff and requires a tool which fits special holes. I could use a punch but I don't want to damage the cup.
I think I might have found a colour which seems to match. I have an aerosol can of Rover Vermillion. The cap looks close, I'll have to spray a test panel for comparison. I thought the colour might have been Ford Carnival Red which was about at the same time.
What appears to be fading on the frame may actually be wear. I tried flatting and polishing up an area but instead of bringing the colour back it became paler with white starting to show through.
I like the fork strengthening plates fitted to the insides of the front forks. They have playing card aces cut into them. I can now see why the person who sold me my Flying Scot thought it was a Woodrup as it also has strengthening plates.

aces.JPG
 
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Illaveago

Illaveago

Guru
I have removed them using a nut and bolt and a couple of washers, you can then remove it using a socket and breaker bar, as it is a reverse thread tightening the nut will remove it, if that makes sense.

Thanks but it is the opposite side so it is normal way round . I was going to make a tool yesterday with a bar which I was going to drill holes to fit small screws into . My circlip pliers are too weak.
 
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