A question about how many calories are burned

LemonJuice

Active Member
This may sound like a stupid question, but...

If your BMR is 1,700 calories and you only eat about 800 calories a day and then go cycling for a couple of hours and say burn 1,000-1,200 calories, does that mean you are creating a calorie deficit of about 1,900 calories a day?

1,700 - 800 = 900

900 (BMR deficit) + 1,000 (burned) = 1,900
 

Scotty55

Active Member
You’re only creating a deficit of 400, surely? Intake of 800 less output of 1200.

You have a higher notional deficit if you look at the recommended intake instead of the actual intake.
 
OP
L

LemonJuice

Active Member
You’re only creating a deficit of 400, surely? Intake of 800 less output of 1200.

You have a higher notional deficit if you look at the recommended intake instead of the actual intake.
Huh?

If someone is eating 900 calories fewer than recommended then he or she is making that a deficit. Add the calories he or she burns then it’s 900 + whatever he or she burns.
 

Scotty55

Active Member
Huh?

If someone is eating 900 calories fewer than recommended then he or she is making that a deficit. Add the calories he or she burns then it’s 900 + whatever he or she burns.
You could increase the deficit then by increasing the recommended intake, though.
 

Scotty55

Active Member
I don’t think I’m expressing myself well. The deficit in real terms is the actual calories consumed, less the calories burned by exercise. However, I didn’t take into account the ‘notional’ calories burned by just being alive.

Too tired after a long ride this morning.....
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
A BMR of 2500 with a 500 deficit = 2000cal consumed per day and = 3500cal deficit per week

A ride or activity of 1000 calories takes your deficit for the day to 1500 - which is too large therefore you need to eat more
 
No,

Depending upon exactly what you are eating you will become glycogen depleted with a day or two and unable to perform the specified ride for the subsequent few days.

How you perform under ketone/glycogen transition is personal and whether you continually switch between ketosis and glycolysis will be in part dependant on the level of under performance whilst switching and the carb intake of the reduced diet.

It is also questioned if ketogenic diets are advisable for those without a medical condition that requires it, such as epilepsy
 
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classic33

Legendary Member
No,

Depending upon exactly what you are eating you will become glycogen depleted with a day or two and unable to perform the specified ride for the subsequent few days.

How you perform under ketone/glycogen transition is personal and whether you continually switch between ketosis and glycolysis will be in part dependant on the level of under performance whilst switching and the carb intake of the reduced diet.

It is also questioned if ketogenic diets are advisable for those without a medical condition that requires it, such as epilepsy
The Ketogenic Diet was "invented" to try and treat epilepsy where drug treatment had failed.

It doesn't work for everyone.
 
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