Absolutely wonderful (formerly absolutely useless) housing association

OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
Honestly as an "elderly and vulnerable" gentleman :whistle::laugh: they really should be replacing the boiler before the weekend, you know, given it's winter. It's unacceptable under any circumstances to allow a tenant to live without hot water and heating during the coldest part of the year.
Even worse,i received an email off the HA this afternoon. They aren't fitting it on Monday,as i thought. No,i'm just getting a phone call from the gas appliances boss to set a date for installation. This time next week i could still be without heat and hot water!👎
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Even worse,i received an email off the HA this afternoon. They aren't fitting it on Monday,as i thought. No,i'm just getting a phone call from the gas appliances boss to set a date for installation. This time next week i could still be without heat and hot water!👎
Point out to them that they are required to complete emergency repairs - of which yours is - in a reasonable time. Nobody would agree that more than a week without hot water or heating in winter is reasonable. I'm not sure of the approriate legislation, but I'm pretty sure that failing to do this within 24 hours could put them in breach of both your tenancy agreement and their obligations in law.
 
OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
Point out to them that they are required to complete emergency repairs - of which yours is - in a reasonable time. Nobody would agree that more than a week without hot water or heating in winter is reasonable. I'm not sure of the approriate legislation, but I'm pretty sure that failing to do this within 24 hours could put them in breach of both your tenancy agreement and their obligations in law.
I've sent the HA this,or similar to this in the past.
https://mylegalclub.co.uk/how-long-does-a-landlord-have-to-fix-a-boiler/
They dismissed it as 'not a legal requirement'.
 
OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
10 days on and still no heating or hot water! They sent someone out today. I thought he'd come to measure up etc,but no,just a test for asbestos. I've tried to phone them,but they don't answer. Tomorrow i'll phone the Environmental Health department at the council. If they can't help i'm going to phone the local paper and see if they want to name and shame Onward Homes.
 

Brains

Legendary Member
Location
Greenwich
I've sent the HA this,or similar to this in the past.
https://mylegalclub.co.uk/how-long-does-a-landlord-have-to-fix-a-boiler/
They dismissed it as 'not a legal requirement'.
As a Landlord, I believe they are correct.

There are no rules to say a boiler must be fixed in 24hrs.
If a boiler breaks down in a Friday before Xmas Eve you will not be getting a fitter on site for at least 4 days, even in an emergency, and if they then take one look and say "it's knackered", then you will be looking at 10 days plus to fit a replacement followed by redecoration or making good thereafter.

Reading through the text of the attachment, there is a reference to the minimum heating being "68 degrees" That must be Farenheit, a temperature scale that has not been valid in the UK for half a century or more. I suspect that bit of text has come from a US site, where Fahrenheit is still a recognised temperature measure. So quite frankly I think the advice is total bo***cks.

That said, I keep in storage about 8 oil filled electric radiators.
Should the heating fail in any of my properties I can have those all set up within 2 hours.
At least the house will be habitable, even if that does not solve the hot water problem.

I was amazed when talking to an agent who works for one of the larger rental companies that they do not have any emergency heating, lighting, water, or flood/fire back up at all, yet boiler failure in particular is a regular event for the company.
It make one understand Grenfell
 

kynikos

Über Member
Location
Elmet
I've sent the HA this,or similar to this in the past.
https://mylegalclub.co.uk/how-long-does-a-landlord-have-to-fix-a-boiler/
They dismissed it as 'not a legal requirement'.
They also say: "...you would be well within your rights to contact the police as they will visit your home, check the temperature and call your landlord with strict orders to carry out his responsibility as a landlord by mending the heating problem." :laugh:

Who dreams up these websites?
 
OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
As a Landlord, I believe they are correct.

There are no rules to say a boiler must be fixed in 24hrs.
If a boiler breaks down in a Friday before Xmas Eve you will not be getting a fitter on site for at least 4 days, even in an emergency, and if they then take one look and say "it's knackered", then you will be looking at 10 days plus to fit a replacement followed by redecoration or making good thereafter.

Reading through the text of the attachment, there is a reference to the minimum heating being "68 degrees" That must be Farenheit, a temperature scale that has not been valid in the UK for half a century or more. I suspect that bit of text has come from a US site, where Fahrenheit is still a recognised temperature measure. So quite frankly I think the advice is total bo***cks.

That said, I keep in storage about 8 oil filled electric radiators.
Should the heating fail in any of my properties I can have those all set up within 2 hours.
At least the house will be habitable, even if that does not solve the hot water problem.

I was amazed when talking to an agent who works for one of the larger rental companies that they do not have any emergency heating, lighting, water, or flood/fire back up at all, yet boiler failure in particular is a regular event for the company.
It make one understand Grenfell
Looks like it's time to accidentally leave the shower head hanging over the shower wall then. That'll get the f..kers out!
 

Brains

Legendary Member
Location
Greenwich
They also say: "...you would be well within your rights to contact the police as they will visit your home, check the temperature and call your landlord with strict orders to carry out his responsibility as a landlord by mending the heating problem." :laugh:

Who dreams up these websites?
As I said upthread, it's total rubbish.
I had a tenant quote a legal clause at me a couple of years ago, I found the original clause, it applies to property rented in the state of Tennessee only. I pointed this out, and suggested if they want to quote the law they should pay for a lawyer.

I've actually spent the last hour becoming re-acquainted with the Landlord & Tenant Act 1985 and subsequent updates.
(which if anyone is having a sleepless night it can be read here )
Whilst section 12 does cover the Landlords responsibilities, and there is mention of space heating as being a Landlords responsibility, it only says 'best endeavour'.
There is zero mention of minimum/maximum heat levels, or even the requirement to heat (or cool) at all.
Nor any mention of getting stuff fixed ASAP

As mentioned above, I suspect the website was a cut and paste job from a US site due to the mention of heat levels in Fahrenheit, which was an obsolete temperature measure long before 1985 .

That said @Accy cyclist, it is in your landlords interest to fix the heating ASAP.
Personally I'd be pestering them daily for an update to either get in a proper heating engineer, who genuinely may have to wait days for parts, if that is what is required, or to condemn the boiler and get in a replacement, which with all due respect will take a couple of weeks.
Asking the HA for electric oil heaters (and for them to pick up the electric bill!) I think is reasonable.
But they are a HA, and really dont give a damn
Whereas I'm private. There may be a case of you pays your money and you takes your choice.
Private is more expensive, but at least you get a personal service.

Flooding your flat will not improve the situation. (And damage would be your responsibility under the L&T Act of 1985)
 
OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
As I said upthread, it's total rubbish.
I had a tenant quote a legal clause at me a couple of years ago, I found the original clause, it applies to property rented in the state of Tennessee only. I pointed this out, and suggested if they want to quote the law they should pay for a lawyer.

I've actually spent the last hour becoming re-acquainted with the Landlord & Tenant Act 1985 and subsequent updates.
(which if anyone is having a sleepless night it can be read here )
Whilst section 12 does cover the Landlords responsibilities, and there is mention of space heating as being a Landlords responsibility, it only says 'best endeavour'.
There is zero mention of minimum/maximum heat levels, or even the requirement to heat (or cool) at all.
Nor any mention of getting stuff fixed ASAP

As mentioned above, I suspect the website was a cut and paste job from a US site due to the mention of heat levels in Fahrenheit, which was an obsolete temperature measure long before 1985 .

That said @Accy cyclist, it is in your landlords interest to fix the heating ASAP.
Personally I'd be pestering them daily for an update to either get in a proper heating engineer, who genuinely may have to wait days for parts, if that is what is required, or to condemn the boiler and get in a replacement, which with all due respect will take a couple of weeks.
Asking the HA for electric oil heaters (and for them to pick up the electric bill!) I think is reasonable.
But they are a HA, and really dont give a damn
Whereas I'm private. There may be a case of you pays your money and you takes your choice.
Private is more expensive, but at least you get a personal service.

Flooding your flat will not improve the situation. (And damage would be your responsibility under the L&T Act of 1985)
i've contacted these,as i said i might do earlier in this thread. https://housingdisrepairhelpline.co...emG3-aaxfQLqmaoRkgfX418yuqeHyLuRoCPyYQAvD_BwE Nothing lost and it might get me a bit of 'compo' for my troubles.
 

Tripster

Über Member
Location
North
i've contacted these,as i said i might do earlier in this thread. https://housingdisrepairhelpline.co...emG3-aaxfQLqmaoRkgfX418yuqeHyLuRoCPyYQAvD_BwE Nothing lost and it might get me a bit of 'compo' for my troubles.
In laws boiler just broke. Due to covid and just generally busy they cannot get a plumber for 4 days minimum to look at it. Expect if it was for replacement they may be waiting longer though I doubt it will want replacing. They are without heating and also have electric shower..... They wont get compo.... its just one of those things. Any inconvenience and we want a claim :ohmy: Very American
 
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