Advice needed for getting a good helmet that fits well.

Cyclopathic

Veteran
Location
Leicester.
After an accident that could have been very much worse I have decided to buy a helmet. There are loads on Amazon and other sites but I don't really like buying anything that I'm going to wear online. It is just far too much hassle when things don't fit or are uncomfortable or just do not look like you thought they would.
That said what is the best way of going about buying a helmet (LBS will be my first port of call but if folk know other ways then I'm all ears)? What are things to look out for in a helmet. I'm not made of money but having made the decision to get one I'm prepared to spend enough to get something decent. I'd hate to have finally made the concession to wear a helmet only for it not to be as effective as it could be.
 
pretty much all cycle helmets available will be compliant with modern safety standards, so the rest comes down to budget and personal preference...
 

Arjimlad

Tights of Cydonia
Location
South Glos
I have owned three or four helmets over the years.

I bought a Canyon Concord on Amazon which I don't like that much. It is too heavy and not well vented. It's OK for winter though.

My newest helmet is by Bell and is a basic sport model which is better vented. The things I would look out for are light weight, lots of vents and insect mesh under the vents to stop stuff getting in your hair.

The basic Bell wheel size adjustment system I find very good. And it is also worth running a tape measure around your bonce so you have some idea what size helmet you need before you make a pratt of yourself trying to push a little one on your head, or wobbling around in one which is too big.
 
OP
Cyclopathic

Cyclopathic

Veteran
Location
Leicester.
Alright, I admit it was a bit of a pointless question. In my defence I'll say that it's always possible that obvious questions will throw up something really useful that one hadn't considered. It has happened to me before. Honest.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Specialized helmets seem to meet the Snell (?) standard as well as the EU/BS ones. Best to try a few out in store as peeps have said. Bit depends on whether you want a more MTB style one (with peak thing), a BMX style one (more like a scooter helmet) or a road style one (bit sleeker, no peak).
 
pretty much all cycle helmets available will be compliant with modern safety standards, so the rest comes down to budget and personal preference...

Not, I am afraid the case... there are multiple standards and some are more effective in testing than others.

For sale in the UK the helmet requires to pass EN1078.

This is so weak and useless that the helmets are banned from Triathlon and racing inthe US. Arrive with an EN1078 helmet and you will be laughed off the course.

The toughest is the Snell B95, and these helmets can be picked up for as little as £30

If you are interested, look at this article for standards, and a list of all Snell certified helmets is here

After that it is a case of making not only sure that it fits, but is comfortable as well!
 

slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
I bought a Specialized Align one which is good to Snell B95A I think. It's pretty comfortable and doesn't cost silly money, about £30. Does it work....? .....I have absolutely no idea, and I really don't care either!
 
OP
Cyclopathic

Cyclopathic

Veteran
Location
Leicester.
Not, I am afraid the case... there are multiple standards and some are more effective in testing than others.

For sale in the UK the helmet requires to pass EN1078.

This is so weak and useless that the helmets are banned from Triathlon and racing inthe US. Arrive with an EN1078 helmet and you will be laughed off the course.

The toughest is the Snell B95, and these helmets can be picked up for as little as £30

If you are interested, look at this article for standards, and a list of all Snell certified helmets is here

After that it is a case of making not only sure that it fits, but is comfortable as well!
Thanks very much. The articles for standards is exactly the sort of thing I meant when I spoke about an obvious sounding question such that I asked, leading to uncovering some titbits of information that I wouldn't ordinarily have found.
I know that I will end up going to the shop and trying things out (after all what other method is there) but I will at least be that bit more informed when I do and it is entirely possible that what I have learned will have a bearing on my choice. Besides it's an interesting subject. I had no idea that the helmet industry was so stagnated with no real standardisation of tests or quality. It certainly puts things into perspective if one is considering spending a fortune on a helmet believing that one costing £150 will be five times better or safer than one costing £30, when in fact it may not even have passed as stringent a test as the cheaper one.
 
I had no idea that the helmet industry was so stagnated with no real standardisation of tests or quality. It certainly puts things into perspective if one is considering spending a fortune on a helmet believing that one costing £150 will be five times better or safer than one costing £30, when in fact it may not even have passed as stringent a test as the cheaper one.
I don't think anyone buys a £150 lid believing it to be 5x better than a £30 lid - if they do, then they are extremely gullible. Most people I know (myself included) buy lids because they like the look of them, they fit, and they like the colour - if you are prepared to pay the price of meeting those criteria, then great. Otherwise, we'd all be riding around in 99p helmets from Poundland.

They all meet a range of safety standards, but don't kid yourself that any of them will protect you in every situation, because they won't. On balance, it's probably better to wear one than not - but wearing one will not turn you into superman....
 
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