Am I too heavy or just unlucky?

doctorj

New Member
I weigh around 95kg and cycle on average about 40km / day, 6 days a week. My rear wheel buckled around 8 miles from home today (and 4 miles from the nearest train), for the second time in about 2 weeks. I've only been cycling for around 6 weeks on my basic Raleigh Pioneer Hybrid.

Being relatively new to cycling, I don't know if I'm just unlucky or if I should be replacing my wheel for something more robust this time.
 

brush3287

New Member
Location
North Hampshire
Unlucky i'd say

doctorj said:
I weigh around 95kg and cycle on average about 40km / day, 6 days a week. My rear wheel buckled around 8 miles from home today (and 4 miles from the nearest train), for the second time in about 2 weeks. I've only been cycling for around 6 weeks on my basic Raleigh Pioneer Hybrid.

Being relatively new to cycling, I don't know if I'm just unlucky or if I should be replacing my wheel for something more robust this time.
Had a quick look at the spec & while I couldn't see any details about spokes I'd suggest that your weight shouldn't have had this effect (maybe another 10kg might)
 

Moodyman

Guru
Wheel strength is determined by spoke tension.

Most off-the-peg bikes come with factory made wheels. Their tension is not always even, although the wheels looks perfectly straight when you spin them.

When you ride this new bike, your weight will put more pressure on the spokes causing the tension to become more uneven.

What started off as a straight wheel will become untrue (slight wobble) and then buckle (severely bent).

Solution - if you have the skills and the right tools (look up wheel truing) then you can get the tension right yourself. Otherwise any local bike shop will be able to this for you. Expect to pay around £10 for a regular wheel truing.

Once a wheel is true (Straight with the right tension in each spoke) it doesn't often go out of true easily.

Re your weight, 95 kg is not that much - I'm 113kg and use regular wheels.
 

Moodyman

Guru
In case you're wondering, there's nothing wrong with factory made wheels. It's just that a machine lacks the feel of a hand that is needed for minute tension adjustment.

This is why handbuilt wheels are favoured (but also more expensive).
 
Hello Dr J,
I am 105kg. (+/-) :biggrin:
I roll around like a beached whale most of the time.
When I'm not on the beach, I ride a Planet X Ti with Shimano Ultegra 6700 wheels. Along with Campagnolo Khamsin - and others for a commute.
The only way I can damage these wheels (so far) is by bamming over every pothole - of which there are many.
Ask your LBS or supplier as to kgs suitability.
But the Shimano, along with the Fulcrum, are the best rolling wheels.
Beware - a commuter wheel is different.
 

Moodyman

Guru
So what should I buy next time?

The same.

If your current wheel is unrepairable, then get another of similar quality. What you have is more than adequate for your needs. Before you leave the shop with your wheel insist that the shop tension it properly for you. It takes them less than five minutes and they shouldn't charge you.

Wheel tensioning involves the turning of the spoke nipples (little turning things next to the rim). Sounds easy, but you need to know what you're doing.

Having said that, I doubt that your wheel is beyond repair. Ask them to look at it first and see if if can be 'trued'. If it can, expect to pay around £10.
 
OP
OP
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doctorj

New Member
Thanks for the advice all. It looks like I'll see if they can true the wheel, else I will just get another...

Aperitif said:
Hello Dr J,
Beware - a commuter wheel is different.
My cycling is predominately the commute - could you please elaborate on this?
 

Moodyman

Guru
My cycling is predominately the commute - could you please elaborate on this?

The wheels that Aperitif is referring to are road racing wheels (as is his bike). Racing wheels are designed for performance - light, handle well and reasonably strong. They can also cost more than most people's bikes. You only realise the benefit if you are racing at a reasonably advanced level.

For commuting, stick the wheels that came with your bike as weight (a few extra grams) won't be an issue for you.
 
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