Another Fork Q! or new bike?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Mike!, 29 Apr 2010.

  1. Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    I currently have a 10 year old Scott Tampico MTB (cost me about £320 back then) which has had light use and is in excellent order.

    Started using it for my 5 mile commute a couple of weeks back so have fitted some Scwalbe City Jets which gave me a great improvement in speed vs effort :tongue:

    I'm now thinking about replacing the Rock Shox Jett front forks for a rigid type, since i've been getting a bit fitter i've really noticed them bouncing around when taking off quicker so they must be slowing me down). I'd be fine doing the work as i'm a practical person just have no idea what type of forks i need??? Anyone help? Would pictures of the bike help?!

    My dilema is if i should spend the money on this bike (tyres and spare tubes etc already cost ~ £40 - i can out these on the wifes bike if i decide to sell it!) or just get a new hybrid which will already be sorted and more likely lighter etc....

    The GT Zum 2 at Halfords looks ok and not too expensive... Did consider a Carrera road bike but i've found an alternative commute that goes across a bit of heathland so a roadie wouldn't be totally suitable!
     
  2. OP
    OP
    Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    OK delete the GT Zum 2 - Just noticed no mudguard or pannier mounts.... lol
     
  3. Globalti

    Globalti Legendary Member

    Why not consider a carbon fork? I believe these can be had for quite reasonable money nowadays, this would be strong, light and give you a smoother ride than a steel or ali fork.

    Your only problem is going to be finding a fork of the right length so that you end up with the frame in approximately the right posture, once you've replaced the old fork. I don't know much about this but I think with a 10 y.o frame you've probably got something like an 80mm travel fork so you shouldn't have too much difficulty.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    I'd have thought Carbon would be £££?
     
  5. e-rider

    e-rider crappy member

    Location:
    South West
    A carbon fork would be silly on such a bike, and as for providing a smoother ride; you simply wouldn't notice that on this old Scott. IMO that would be a waste of money. You can buy good lightweight steel Cr-Mo rigid forks from the likes of Surly or Salsa that would fit this bike perfectly (remember to get the correct Axle to Crown length - very important) for about £50. You could fit them yourself but I'm guessing you don't have the specilaist tools so a decent shop will charge a bit more for fitting (perhaps £15)
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    Specialist tools to replace a front fork??! :rofl:
     
  7. e-rider

    e-rider crappy member

    Location:
    South West
    Yes, a crown race remover and setter and a star nut fitting tool, ....and; if you replace the headset, a headset press and cup remover. As well as a steerer tube cutter and guide.

    Even if you go for budget tools that's going to cost £130+
    Best to get a shop to fit them.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    :rofl:

    I'll be talking to my LBS then to see what they say.

    Thanks for the help
     
  9. Armegatron

    Armegatron Active Member

    Mike, I'm also interested in removing the suspension forks on my Scott in favor of rigid ones. Please do keep us posted on how you manage with this and good luck.
     
  10. buddha

    buddha Veteran

    If you use a little care all the tools you'd need are a large screwdriver and hammer (to remove the crown race from the old fork) and an allen key. And of course a metal saw to cut the steerer to length.

    I recently converted a 2006 mtb with a Surly 1x1 which cost £54 from wiggle on one of their weekend 'sales'. (this includes the £5 voucher (free when you change your details)).

    edit: almost forgot - £1.99 for a new star nut - inserted using a hammer, whittled down bit of wood as a guide, and again - a bit of care!

    It's not too difficult - see:

    View: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAYYtAhAxS0


    View: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7F8BnCcetk
     
  11. e-rider

    e-rider crappy member

    Location:
    South West
    NO NO NO do not use a screwdriver and hammer!
     
  12. buddha

    buddha Veteran

    Why not - I've done so on 3 bikes. Steel is hard stuff!
     
  13. e-rider

    e-rider crappy member

    Location:
    South West
    I like those 'bungs' but they don't fit all steerer tubes - it depends on the internal diameter of the tube.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    I'll take a look at the vids tomorrow but i must admit my main concern is getting the right fork type / length etc!
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Mike!

    Mike! Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    So can i check something before buying anything.

    Axle to crown measurement is all i need to check?

    I assume this is the measurement from the axle of the wheel to the top of the arch in the forks?
     
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