Any idea which is the more relaxed bike out of these ?

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Going for a weeks cycling holiday in Majorca.
My normal "long" rides are 45ish miles (short to many on here) but my neck seizes up around 30 miles so I need a relaxed frame eg NOT aggressive.
My road bike is a Giant Defy.
I have contacted various bike hire places near to where I am staying and having explained what I need the 2 best options seem to be.............

Pinarello Treviso or Razha

Colagno CLX
Can anyone offer constructive thoughts on these ?

(before anyone suggests it I (think) I can get a Defy but at silly prices). May do that but think I would like to try something new to me.
 

Spiderweb

Not So Special One
Location
North Yorkshire
Not sure about the Trevisio, that looks like a flat bar commuter bike.
The Razha looks to fit your needs, comfort geometry with a long head tube, review here;
https://www.bikeradar.com/reviews/bikes/road-bikes/pinarello-razha-k-105-11s-mix-review/

Reviews of the Colnago suggest it has ‘more of a race geometry than you might expect’.
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/reviews/road-bikes/colnago-clx
 
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Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Thinking that a frame is relaxed or otherwise, I think is a bit of a myth. To get a relaxed position, you need to emulate the position of the pedals, saddle and bars to the same that you are used to at home. With this in mind, take a tape measure with you and the key measurements from your current bike. You should be able to emulate the saddle to BB position exactly. This just leaves the handlebars to worry about. This will be reliant on enough spacers below/above the stem to provide adjustability or the stem being flippable. The shop may offer to help with this, or you could take with you an adjustable stem and a few allen keys.

Have a good holiday.
 
OP
Dave7

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Thinking that a frame is relaxed or otherwise, I think is a bit of a myth. To get a relaxed position, you need to emulate the position of the pedals, saddle and bars to the same that you are used to at home. With this in mind, take a tape measure with you and the key measurements from your current bike. You should be able to emulate the saddle to BB position exactly. This just leaves the handlebars to worry about. This will be reliant on enough spacers below/above the stem to provide adjustability or the stem being flippable. The shop may offer to help with this, or you could take with you an adjustable stem and a few allen keys.

Have a good holiday.
Problem being I have to prebook to be certain of the bike.....it is such a popular cycle hire area.
My main problem is height of bars compared to saddle, plus of course the reach.
 

Kajjal

Veteran
Location
Wheely World
Simple changes to any bike to make the riding position more relaxed are flip the stem to the upright position and move the spacers. Beyond that it would be stem changes as they are unlikely to change bars etc.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Problem being I have to prebook to be certain of the bike.....it is such a popular cycle hire area.
My main problem is height of bars compared to saddle, plus of course the reach.
That's the issue. Without knowing how the two hire bikes are set up, it is difficult to say which would give the most comfortable riding position.
Just use your lucky penny and toss heads or tails to decide.
 

Spiderweb

Not So Special One
Location
North Yorkshire
Problem being I have to prebook to be certain of the bike.....it is such a popular cycle hire area.
My main problem is height of bars compared to saddle, plus of course the reach.
I would just book the Razha, they will ask you what pedals you would like fitting ie SPD, SPD SL, Look, Flats etc.
At the same time ask them to raise the bars as high as possible and I would take a small multi tool with you to make any adjustments to the saddle position if necessary as you ride.
In my experience bike hire shops abroad are always really helpful, they want to set up the bike to suit the rider.
 
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Location
Loch side.
Dave, I think you're overthinking this. Within a range of bikes that stop just above a proper downhill bike, "relaxed" means absolutely nothing. Just get the cheapest decent bike and go ride and make sure you have a beer afterwards. That will be more relaxing than an angle.
 
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