audax on garmin edge

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
Im doing an 100k audax this saturday, and the directions of where to go are online and ive just got a garmin edge 705 with a mapping sd card, but was wondering how I could upload it onto my edge?
 

gavintc

Guru
Location
Southsea
I think Garmin Edge and Audax are mutually exclusive activities. From my limited experience, the Garmin will provide you important information on distance travelled from last junction and will aid you greatly in getting your turns accurate. If you can plot the route beforehand, you may be able to download the route, but it may prove incorrect and therefore confusing when the Garmin is bleeping away at you turn now and everyone else is heading straight on. Good luck.
 

yello

Legendary Member
Location
France
gavintc said:
I think Garmin Edge and Audax are mutually exclusive activities.
I think that might be a joke Sarah.

Suffice to say, I have ridden audaxes using my Edge 305.

Do you know what format the route is in? I'm guessing GPX. You'll need to convert that before being able to send it to your Edge. Personally, I found using BikeRouteToaster the neatest way of doing all that was necessary. Load the GPX on the 'Courses' tab and send it to your Edge on the 'Summary' tab.

There are other ways but I found that the quickest.
 
OP
sarahpink

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
hi thanks for the replies, on the ctc website it has a link for the gps file but when i try and download it on my computer my adobe reader comes up with an error messages saying that they cannot open the file because its either damaged or is not a supported file type.

this is the link to the page

http://www.ctcdevon.co.uk/delight_info.htm
 

yello

Legendary Member
Location
France
Sarah, that's a format specific to MemoryMap. That's why your computer's freaking, it knows nothing about Memory Map. We'll need to convert that file to something more usable. I'll just have a look at a couple of sites and come back in a bit.
 

yello

Legendary Member
Location
France
You can convert it here

Select type of GPS data as 'Track', Input file format as 'Memory Map overlay file (.mmo), and output file as 'Garmin Training Centre (.tcx), leave the other fields as in, click 'convert'

when that's done, download the resulting file and upload it into Garmin Training Centre (the software that came with the 705), send it to your 705.
 

PpPete

Guru
Location
Chandler's Ford
Sarah
Can't help with specifics because I don't have an Edge model or memory map but what I can tell you is it's worth persevering with this...
I caught up loads of time on much faster and more experienced Audaxers by having the route on my GPS on my first 100km. (there was a small mistake on the printed routed route instructions)
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
Which mapping have you got on the Garmin?

City Navigator, Topo GB or Metroguide.

You MUST have Mapsource on your PC.


Open a new file on Mapsource, find and save the stamp and INFO controls, using short abbreviated names.

Create routes between. The whole route will be a series of several shorter routes.
Compare what Mapsource generates to the routesheet, and if different, grab and drag the mapsource route to junctions so mapsource is forced to follow the routesheet. These places are called 'Viapoints', not 'Waypoints'.

When you load to the handset, the 'Waypoints' and routes will be visible but not the 'Viapoints'. These are integral in the routes.

If you have Metroguide, its a longer process because when you ask for the route on the handset, it is constructed of Straight lines between Viapoints. This means a Viapoint needs to be on every important junction, and therefore a Viapoint count is necessary. I can get away with about thirty Viapoints per route.
Two stamp controls and two INFO controls will be five routes of average 20 km each on a 100km AUK. Sometimes longer, sometimes shorter.

I use a Blue Flag for Stamp Controls and a Question Mark for INFO controls. It makes the map look pretty.

Incidentally. Building the route longhand on Mapsource encourages you to 'learn' the route. Then, when riding the route, you can visualise the map and remember the viapoints you added.


PS. Its about three hours work.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
I'm riding an Audax 100 this Sunday with my home club.

The route starts 2 miles from home and travels in a big 'oval' round where I work.
The lanes are well known to me.

The bike I will be riding has a Cateye Mity 3 with auto start/stop inhibit.
My Edge 605 will be in my back pocket recording the ride.

I have though, gone through the whole process of creating routes for the ride.

At the first INFO control south of Loxley, I know there is a stone cross on the grass area. I have a suspicion the question will be about the inscription on the stonework. :biggrin:
 

PpPete

Guru
Location
Chandler's Ford
And of course you wouldn't go and check the whole inscription on the stone beforehand?:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

TBH I've never mastered "routes", as every device seems to use different algorithms. "Tracks" OTH are fixed. If the ride doesn't offer one, I create it by following the instructions through in bikehike (useful to have satellite/OSM/Googlemaps in one window and Landranger in t'other) ... and as Jimbo says it's useful to "learn" the route.
Use options tab to reduce it to 500 points (limit for my Etrex) then save to hard drive as GPX (or TCX for an Edge?)
Can export direct to the device using Garmin Communicator, but I generally check it by opening it in Mapsource instead and using that to export to the device.
To do that for a 100 km ride shouldn't take anything like as long as 3 hours (unless you decide also to print & laminate Landranger sections off of bikehike like I did the first time.... totally superfluous)
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
porkypete said:
And of course you wouldn't go and check the whole inscription on the stone beforehand?:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

TBH I've never mastered "routes", as every device seems to use different algorithms. "Tracks" OTH are fixed. If the ride doesn't offer one, I create it by following the instructions through in bikehike (useful to have satellite/OSM/Googlemaps in one window and Landranger in t'other) ... and as Jimbo says it's useful to "learn" the route.
Use options tab to reduce it to 500 points (limit for my Etrex) then save to hard drive as GPX (or TCX for an Edge?)
Can export direct to the device using Garmin Communicator, but I generally check it by opening it in Mapsource instead and using that to export to the device.
To do that for a 100 km ride shouldn't take anything like as long as 3 hours (unless you decide also to print & laminate Landranger sections off of bikehike like I did the first time.... totally superfluous)
Its this bit that is time consuming, due mainly to instructions being glib and 'economical with wording'.
Decent routesheets have road names associated with junctions. Most routesheets have distance from last point and something saying "L at T, SP Timbuktu".
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
porkypete said:
And of course you wouldn't go and check the whole inscription on the stone beforehand?xx(:biggrin::biggrin:

TBH I've never mastered "routes", as every device seems to use different algorithms. "Tracks" OTH are fixed. If the ride doesn't offer one, I create it by following the instructions through in bikehike (useful to have satellite/OSM/Googlemaps in one window and Landranger in t'other) ... and as Jimbo says it's useful to "learn" the route.
Use options tab to reduce it to 500 points (limit for my Etrex) then save to hard drive as GPX (or TCX for an Edge?)
Can export direct to the device using Garmin Communicator, but I generally check it by opening it in Mapsource instead and using that to export to the device.
To do that for a 100 km ride shouldn't take anything like as long as 3 hours (unless you decide also to print & laminate Landranger sections off of bikehike like I did the first time.... totally superfluous)
To do this, I would have to ride 7 miles extra on my 23 mile commute tonight. It would mean I would be 1/2 hour later home and as far as I'm concerned, evening time is valuable.
On Sunday, I have ALL DAY to go on a 70 mile short flat bike ride.

The extra riding tonight would be 3 miles more than I save on Sunday. :sad: ....

Incidentally, after studying the route, between INFO_1 and Kineton, the riders have an option. The routesheet follows a shallow incline up and over to Kineton which is 14km. The shortest route is 11km BUT goes up a 10%, down a 10%, up another 10% and down a 10% into Kineton.

Being a 100km BP, there will be children riding, and as these two inclines are at the most remote part of the route, the organiser has opted to be kind.
Also, the two climbs are on approach to Compton Verney, a local tourist centre, and the road is bound to be busy on this sunny Sunday. Not where a sensible organiser would direct children to ride.:smile:
 

yello

Legendary Member
Location
France
porkypete said:
TCX file is here

Good man pp, top marks. I was going to do something similar.

Sarah, you should be able to plug your Edge into the USB port of your computer and send the track directly to it. Look on the 'Summary' tab of BikeRouteToaster web page and you'll see 'Download To Garmin GPS, click 'tcx' and bob will be your auntie. Good luck!

Meanwhile, the others can mess around with mapping software xx(
 
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