Bikes for distance riding

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
I am trying to also figure out flat vs drop. The thing I can’t deny is the most comfortable of all hand positions is on the hoods. I think the rest of the bike geometry has to solve neck strain of looking up all day.
My previous commute bike was a flat bar hybrid with some stubby bar ends. Hand positions consisted of on the grips, holding the knuckle, clamp at the ends of the bars, on the bar ends proper, and finally on the tips of the bar ends. Lots of variety and a good bike for commuting and long distance rides. I covered many 100 mile rides and even a one-off 185 miles in a day trip and never felt like I was held back by not riding drop bars.
I do have drop bar bikes, didn't really get on with the drops on my first one until I got a bike with flared drop bars. These suit me so much I am on the drops more than the hoods and have fitted the same bars to my new commuter.
I only replaced the flat bar hybrid because the frame cracked after 20,000 miles :cry:

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mudsticks

Über Member
I got a Giant toughroad last year, for all the things, and reasons you detail.
Just shy of a grand.

I've not ridden it nearly as much as I'd have liked. Been a bit busy elsewhere.

But I am about to take it 650km or so across the top of hilly Northern Spain.

It's certainly light - aluminiun frame, and flat bars.

But I have just had bar ends fitted to give an optional change in hand position.

Will have to see how it goes..

It's so hard to recommend a bike, it's a a bit like shoes.
Fit is everything.

Fit for purpose, fit for you.

Best to try out lots, spend weeks agonising, then go for the one that appeals the most.

Then spend a few more weeks worrying you've made the wrong choice.

At the end of it, all modern bikes are pretty high spec, and there will always be someone telling you you should have got a [........] instead

It's the downside of almost unlimited choice :sad:
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
That's true, but an awful lot of them are Evans Cycles...
On a serious note, it's useful to get some tips for brands / models to look at. I know @DCLane does a lot of distance cycling, so a tip from him is worth looking at.

The Sonder Camino also looks interesting.
@Pale Rider's suggestion looks fab, but my concern would be that it is not much lighter than my existing bike.

That said the Giant doesn't show a weigh, just some maths for each part. It *looks* light tho...

Go to Evans and have a look at their Pinnacle range. Great bikes for the money.
Also as @Racing roadkill said, Decathlon. Well worth a visit. They really can't be beat for the price/value/kit.

If you do stick with flat bar you can always add bar ends.
 
OP
icowden

icowden

Senior Member
Location
Surrey
Hmmm, thanks @I like Skol. The flared drops look interesting. The slightly wider position is something that definitely appeals to me. I never liked the narrowness of drops.

Interesting that since your highighting of the brake fault Chain-Reaction no longer seem to stock Kona.

Something else to think about!
 
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Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
Thanks @Sharky. My issue with dropped handlebars stems from being made to have a raleigh racing bike as my first bike (thanks Dad). I never felt particularly stable or in control of it. I've always felt better placed with flat bars. Maybe now I am older (and possibly wiser) I should try some test rides with drops and see how I get on...

Can an old dog learn new tricks? (well "old" by the definition of the retirement homes I saw in the New Forest - 45 and over ?!!)
Dad's have a lot to answer for. My Dad made me ride "fixed" when I was 10. Didn't get a geared bike until I was 14. And I bought my daughter a pink, probably Raleigh with dropped handlebars when she was about 10. She now commutes about 1 mile to the station on a flat bar bike.
 

mudsticks

Über Member
Whereas mums..

Mine forbade all bikes, til we were too old to be told... Thought they were dangerous.

Both me n my bro have been bike nuts ever since.

Nice bit of reverse psychology there ma :okay:
 

Chuckschreiner

Regular
Location
Los Angeles
I ride well over 90% of the time on the hoods/tops, but I wouldn't want to lose the 10% by switching to flats.

A few years ago, I switched from traditional deep drop handlebars to compact bars. These have less of a drastic drop and are much more comfortable..
Neck strains can lessen as you do more mileage. I often find in the spring, after a low mileage winter that I get neck strain, but tends to disappear as the mileage creeps up.

Another option is to fit clip-on tri-bars. When positioned at a higher position than you would for racing, they can give you a comfortable riding position and takes strains off your neck and arms. They also have a bonus that it will make you faster by keeping your arms tucked in front of your body.
Thx...My neck had 2 whiplashes within 6 weeks decades ago, never fully recovered so I don’t know but I am sure more riding = better adjusted.

Clip-on tri-bars - so that’s what they are called. Had to google the name. I had heard of compact bars and that makes some sense.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
That's true, but an awful lot of them are Evans Cycles...
On a serious note, it's useful to get some tips for brands / models to look at. I know @DCLane does a lot of distance cycling, so a tip from him is worth looking at.

The Sonder Camino also looks interesting.
@Pale Rider's suggestion looks fab, but my concern would be that it is not much lighter than my existing bike.

That said the Giant doesn't show a weigh, just some maths for each part. It *looks* light tho...
Loads of independents too in London and esp SW London :okay:

There’s a Giant store in Twickenham, good place to start
 
OP
icowden

icowden

Senior Member
Location
Surrey
You did that in a morning? !

Update: found the bit in the video where it gave the stats. I am loving that app. 6 hours 34 for 106 miles - pretty good going. You are faster than me (59 miles in 5 hours last weekend).
 
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