Brompton Emergency Toolkit - Recommendations?

Mrs dmoan and I have recently taken delivery of his ‘n’ hers shiny new Bromptons (both M6R spec’d). I treated myself to a Brooks Challenge saddlebag, and would appreciate any recommendations on tools to carry at all times to cover the most obvious roadside emergency fixes.

Obviously, a spare inner tube, puncture repair kit and tyre levers are a given, but could anyone recommend spanner, spoke key or Allan key sizes to accommodate taking wheels off, fixing loose racks, tightening saddles, adjusting brakes etc?
 

Yellow Fang

Legendary Member
Location
Reading
Bromptons don't have allen bolts, so those multi-tools won't be much help. Those barbell shaped spanners with ten bolt sizes would be good to have. Maybe a small adjustable spanner too. If you have Schwalbe Marathon or other puncture proof tyres, you won't need a spare tube very often. If you don't then you will need some very strong tyre levers because the tyres are a bastard to get off.
 

srw

It's a bit more complicated than that...
dmoan said:
Mrs dmoan and I have recently taken delivery of his ‘n’ hers shiny new Bromptons (both M6R spec’d). I treated myself to a Brooks Challenge saddlebag, and would appreciate any recommendations on tools to carry at all times to cover the most obvious roadside emergency fixes.
The phone number of a reputable taxi firm, and a bit of knowledge about bus and train routes. Oh, and a pair of Schwalbe Marathons to ward off the puncture fairy.

It's so easy to transport a Brompton that it's not worth carrying anything.
 

palinurus

Legendary Member
Location
Watford
I only used to carry tools if I was riding into areas where there wasn't much public transport. Spare tube, levers and a spanner to get the wheels off was basically it.

Otherwise just money.
 
Erm, mine does have allen bolts? need one for the brakes (if you need to get the back wheel off), and also for the saddle adjustment (ok, not an emergency adjustment there, but an allen key is so small anyway...)

You also need a size 16 cone spanner, if you ever need one, which isn't the standard size AFAIK so it might be worth having one with you.

And the seatpost spring adjuster is a size 10 spanner, as I've just adjusted that, but it's not supposed to need much adjusting so doubt that's useful for an emergency bag.

I can have a measure up tonight for you if no-one else's got the exact sizes (for brakes etc etc).
I'm more of the 'catch a bus' brigade for my usual trips, I've just got the tyre levers, pump, spare inner tube and puncture kit with me...
 

srw

It's a bit more complicated than that...
SavageHoutkop said:
Erm, mine does have allen bolts? need one for the brakes (if you need to get the back wheel off),
Why do you need to adjust the brakes if you need to get the back wheel off? Just deflate the tyre and it fits through easily.
 
OP
dmoan

dmoan

Veteran
SavageHoutkop said:
I can have a measure up tonight for you if no-one else's got the exact sizes (for brakes etc etc).
I'm more of the 'catch a bus' brigade for my usual trips, I've just got the tyre levers, pump, spare inner tube and puncture kit with me...
That would be brillant - thank you!

I entirely accept the angle of 'don't try to fix by the road, just get a bus home' but I'd hate to end a nice day out for the want of a spanner or Allan key. I'm happy for the kit to be permanently attached, so to speak, so even if the tools are not used very often (if at all), I'm happy to carry them. The bag is pretty small, after all...

I'd also quite like to come over to London to ride the FNRtTC sometime next year on the Brompton (hand-luggage on a bus - £59.68 return from Belfast - hooray!), and I would be hugely embarrassed if I could not fix something as simple as a wobbly saddle without begging another rider for a lend of their multitool!

BTW, I am currently running the Brompton Kevlar tyres, but will probably change to the Schwalbe Marathons when the time comes.
 
It's worth copying and laminating the manual re removing/refitting wheels........ It also helps to read it, cue story about chain being refitted incorrectly, DOH!
 
OP
dmoan

dmoan

Veteran
Old Walrus said:
It's worth copying and laminating the manual re removing/refitting wheels........ It also helps to read it, cue story about chain being refitted incorrectly, DOH!
Excellent recommendation - easily done and can sit at the bottom of the saddlebag until needed.
 
I just serviced our fleet of twenty Bromptons the other day. They needed remarkably little work considering the hard lives they lead. Lube chain and inflate tyres and they're ready for another few months of abuse. Brompton tyres are excellent, Spandex may correct me but as far as I'm aware in the fourteen months we have had them not one of ours has suffered a flat.

Two or three of them required new front drop-out clips, damaged by cackhanded folding. On two of them the retaining screw for the chain-tensioner had started to come undone.
Quite a few of them needed the seat-post quick release tightened.
Those few derailer models which have done high mileage in wet weather (rather than road-show work) needed their jockey wheels lubed. A few needed their Sturmey cable adjusted and one or two have suffered front mudgourd damage, caused by poor folding again. Our Bromptons really do have hard lives and they stand up to it remarkably well, they really are tough little bikes.

By all means equip yourself with the tools required to change a tube but it's hardly worth the effort. You'd be better off augmenting the puncture resistant tyres with 'Stan's No Tubes' tyre-sealant squirted into the tube.
 

Rohloff_Brompton_Rider

Formerly just_fixed
i have a topeak alien multi tool which seems to fit everything except cone spanner size which i need to get. excellent suggestion for tyre sealant, easily put into the car valve (presta?)style. on my new brommie plenty off allen key's needed.
 
Right, so my quick check last night came up with (now these are the easily accessible things, so no promises on anything that wasn't immediately visible, except that as I've mentioned AFAIK the cone spanner is a size 16. We've got ours at home but haven't used it yet...) :

(I'm not good with technically correct names here so bear with me!)

8mm spanner - connections of rear rack to frame, also there is a little nut on the gear indicator rod coming out of the sturmey archer that is this size (no idea what it does, though...). Also my EasyWheels are attached with 8mm nuts, as are my rear light and rack.

10mm spanner - seat pillar spring adjuster, part of the brake assembly, a mudguard nut connecting mudguard to frame, and I *think* the suspension bung but I didn't measure that one...

15mm spanner - wheel nuts

18mm spanner - *a* nut on the wheel-side of the rear wheel assembly - closer to the wheel than the thing you adjust with the cone spanner.

5mm hex/allen key - Brake pads, also pentaclip adjustment for saddle

6mm hex/allen key - connecting handlebars to upright, and also it seems the nut connecting the clip which the handlebars clip into when folded is 6mm...

2.5mm allen key - there is one of these on top of the brakes on the front wheel. Don't have the foggiest what it does...

2mm allen key - on the back of the gear 'triggers' on the handlebars

3mm allen key - on the front of the gear 'triggers' on the handlebars, & the bell

And, of course, there are several spots where a screwdriver is needed...
 
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