Carbon frame on a turbo?

Chrisz

Über Member
Location
Sittingbourne
Does this work or do the chainstays crack?

I want to be able to keep pedalling but a broken wrist is currently keeping me off the bike - a turbo is the logical alternative ;)

However, my winter bike is in bits in the shed and (being one-handed) I am unable to re-assemble it to a point where I can use it on the turbo.

My summer frame is a rather nice Orbea but I've heard stories/whispers of the chainstays cracking when using carbon frames on a turbo trainer - urban myth or fact?
 

raindog

er.....
Location
France
I thought carbon was supposed to be stronger than the other materials? That's what we keep being told anyway. ;)
 

gavintc

Guru
Location
Southsea
I know it seems rather a risk to use a carbon frame, but I have asked quite extensively amongst coaches training top end cyclists and all have assured me that it will not damage the frame. As I have only 2 bikes and in the winter, the winter one is set up for riding, I use the good bike for the turbo with a turbo wheel. I do not stand up, just ride in the saddle - so far no damage.
 
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Chrisz

Chrisz

Über Member
Location
Sittingbourne
.........as someone else just pointed out - you often see the pros on carbon using turbos - I feel fairly sure that they put out more power warming up than I can muster peak ;)
 

PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19
Chrisz said:
.........as someone else just pointed out - you often see the pros on carbon using turbos - I feel fairly sure that they put out more power warming up than I can muster peak :ohmy:
but the pros throw a frame away once it gets dirty! ;) & i doubt they will head down a mountain at 50mph on the same bike they had on the turbo.

I know nothing of the risk of damage, but just because the pros use an identical carbon frame on their turbo to their race bike is no argument that there is no risk of damage.
 
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Chrisz

Chrisz

Über Member
Location
Sittingbourne
PK99 said:
but the pros throw a frame away once it gets dirty! ;) & i doubt they will head down a mountain at 50mph on the same bike they had on the turbo.
I wouldn't imagine that even the top pro teams are rich enough to have a "turbo frame" for each rider + a race frame, possibly a climbing frame too?


PK99 said:
I know nothing of the risk of damage, but just because the pros use an identical carbon frame on their turbo to their race bike is no argument that there is no risk of damage.
But you never hear reports of a rider breaking the frame (disposable or otherwise) whilst on the turbo - and as the warm-up sessions also serve as photo-opportunities and press conferences I can't imagine that it happens and we don't hear about it!


Has anyone actually broken a carbon frame whilst on their turbo??? :ohmy:
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
OK.. where exactly does the turbo clamp to - oh yes the axel.......... :smile: not the frame be it of wood, steel, putty etc......

Perfectly OK to use any bike in a turbo. The only thing you may need to think about is not using your best wheels and tyres..only cos the heat might (I say might) cause issues if you over tighten the roller.... I've used Mich Pro Race 2 tyres on a turbo, no problem.....

I have a spare wheel and a cheap tyre for turbo use now...not that I use the turbo much - it's too boring.....:sad:

PS carbon melts if you pedal too fast without moving you know..... give it to me. :boxing: Conversely, steel rusts to bits if you sweat on it, and alloy just falls to bits with any sign of salt....... :wahhey:

Just ride............enjoy :thumbsup:
 
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Chrisz

Chrisz

Über Member
Location
Sittingbourne
fossyant said:
PS carbon melts if you pedal too fast without moving you know.....
So my sweat won't make the carbon weaker then?


Trust me - I'd love to be out and about on the bike but currently I have no choice in the matter :smile:

At least on the turbo I have a slight chance of retaining some fitness :boxing:
 

RedBike

New Member
Location
Beside the road
A turbotrainer holds the rear wheel vertical whereas on the road the bike is free to rock from side to side, so a turbo trainer does put additional stress on a frame. I would be (am) happy using my carbon frame on the turbo though.
 

zacklaws

Veteran
Location
Beverley
RedBike said:
A turbotrainer holds the rear wheel vertical whereas on the road the bike is free to rock from side to side, so a turbo trainer does put additional stress on a frame. I would be (am) happy using my carbon frame on the turbo though.
This was what I was told in the LBS when I bought my turbo, the one I wanted did not flex and would not do the carbon frame much good so they recomended me another. If you look at turbo's there seems to be two different types of frame, one with two triangles both sides supporting the bike and the other just a pair of bars sticking up, the latter was what I was recomended for carbon frames as the turbo will flex with the bike.

But despite that, I have never seen anything to the contrary to back it up.
 

Steve Austin

The Marmalade Kid
Location
Mlehworld
I used a ti bike on a turbo a few times. due to the frame flex, it was like sitting a flagpole on a windy day!

I don't think you could damage a carbon frame on a turbo, but i wouldn't want to use it long term like this.

and you'll need a sweat net, sweat melts carbon :biggrin:
 

baznav

Active Member
I'm in the bike trade and i know that there are companys that say not to use their carbon bikes in turbo trainers so it is down to what brand you have, and as said in an earlier reply it is down to how the carbon is laid up to make the frame stiff and responsive whilst riding useing stress analysis and less carbon is used in less stressed areas.
However when you clamp the rear axle in a turbo trainer it alters where the stresses are and when you stand on a turbo you get huge twisting forces through the frame that you don't get out on the road.
 

cbs

Well-Known Member
Thread resurrection time - the last post in this was a couple of years ago, so there may be more experience around now...

I have just bought a Cube Litening and whilst perusing the manual, I noticed that it specifically says not to use it on a fixed roller trainer. I do occasionally use a trainer when I don't have much time, and my wife uses it a lot more with her carbon Scott.

I can see that the stresses might be different, especially if you stand up and give it some welly as the bike is not able to move from side to side, but has to absorb the forces through twisting of the chain stays. But, is it really going to cause a problem?

Opinions, please ^_^

Colin
 

02GF74

Über Member
I can see that the stresses might be different, especially if you stand up and give it some welly as the bike is not able to move from side to side, but has to absorb the forces through twisting of the chain stays. But, is it really going to cause a problem?
Well that's the problem, we all agree that by clamping the rear wheel so it cannot move put more stress on the frame, but will this repeated flexing cause a carbon frame to fail? We just don't know and few of us are brave enough to test our £ 1 k+ carbon frames. (not that I have a carbon road bike)
 
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