Chain slipping

Inertia

I feel like I could... TAKE ON THE WORLD!!
I had to drive in today :tongue:. I replaced my old chain which was at the stretch limit (for replacing but not to have damaged anything). I messed up replacing the chain as I pushed the chain pin all the way out by mistake so I ended up making the chain shorter than I wanted but it seemed ok. I went out this morning and the chain slips like mad, constantly slipping. I turned around and went straight back and had to hop in teh car and get going.

I assumed it was because the chain is too short but after loooking at other posts it sounds like it may be the rear cassette. It didnt happen in one gear though, it happened in a few as I tried to find a gear that was ok before heading back.

I wanted to order something to fix it and get back up and running quickly now but Im guessing I will have to wait till I get back to study it more. Unless someone can say, its definately the cassette? :ohmy:
 

GilesM

Guru
Location
East Lothian
Almost definately needs a new cassette aswell, a new chain will not normally work with a worn cassette. Definately not because the chain is one link too short.
 
GilesM said:
Almost definately needs a new cassette aswell, a new chain will not normally work with a worn cassette. Definately not because the chain is one link too short.
+1 - having just replaced my chain (is it the season for chain swaps or what!) it also skips like crazy, but only in my three favourite gears. Close inspection shows sloping teeth on the cassette and I really should have changed it at the same time as the chain. Or in future, change the chain a lot earlier!
 

GilesM

Guru
Location
East Lothian
2Loose said:
+1 - having just replaced my chain (is it the season for chain swaps or what!) it also skips like crazy, but only in my three favourite gears. Close inspection shows sloping teeth on the cassette and I really should have changed it at the same time as the chain. Or in future, change the chain a lot earlier!
Buy three new chains at the same time as you buy a new cassette, change the chain every couple of months, then the cassette will wear with the three chains, hence you get three chain life times with one cassette, it does work.
 
OP
Inertia

Inertia

I feel like I could... TAKE ON THE WORLD!!
Thanks for the replies guys :biggrin:. I might nip to halford ( I know but its on my way home and I need my bike dammit!) and get a SRAM one, even if its not the problem, I will need it sooner or later.
 
OP
Inertia

Inertia

I feel like I could... TAKE ON THE WORLD!!
GilesM said:
Buy three new chains at the same time as you buy a new cassette, change the chain every couple of months, then the cassette will wear with the three chains, hence you get three chain life times with one cassette, it does work.
Very Cunning, I like it
 

02GF74

Über Member
more cunning would be buying 100 chains, replacing every week and then never have to buy a no ther cassette ever.

as ^^^^ say, your cassette is worn - what stretch limit are you using? I've found even with 0.75% can get some jump.
 
OP
Inertia

Inertia

I feel like I could... TAKE ON THE WORLD!!
02GF74 said:
as ^^^^ say, your cassette is worn - what stretch limit are you using? I've found even with 0.75% can get some jump.
I used the Sheldon Brown method and thought I had caught it early enough since it was around the 1/16" mark.
 

twentysix by twentyfive

Clinging on tightly
Location
Over the Hill
Or just run the old chain and cassette together. Till death do they part.....
 

ASC1951

Guru
Location
Yorkshire
twentysix by twentyfive said:
Or just run the old chain and cassette together.
Nah, doesn't work. Chains always wear more quickly than cassettes.

I know that running three or four chains at once makes theoretical sense, but it's always struck me as a bit OCD. Not quite like having the tyre makers name next to the valve hole, but up there.
 

jazzkat

Fixed wheel fanatic.
ASC1951 said:
Nah, doesn't work. Chains always wear more quickly than cassettes.

I know that running three or four chains at once makes theoretical sense, but it's always struck me as a bit OCD. Not quite like having the tyre makers name next to the valve hole, but up there.
As someone who once had to replace the whole drive train because he hadn't kept an eye on things. Definitely cheaper to replace the chain regularly.
 

youngoldbloke

The older I get, the faster I used to be ...
ASC1951 said:
Nah, doesn't work. Chains always wear more quickly than cassettes.

I know that running three or four chains at once makes theoretical sense, but it's always struck me as a bit OCD. Not quite like having the tyre makers name next to the valve hole, but up there.
-what's wrong with that, then?
 
OP
Inertia

Inertia

I feel like I could... TAKE ON THE WORLD!!
Thanks for the advice guys, now I have to replace the cassette. Is there a special tool I need to remove it or can I use normal tools? I have a Shimano HG40 cassette.
 

rh100

Well-Known Member
ASC1951 said:
Nah, doesn't work. Chains always wear more quickly than cassettes.

I know that running three or four chains at once makes theoretical sense, but it's always struck me as a bit OCD. Not quite like having the tyre makers name next to the valve hole, but up there.
There is a purpose to that
 
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