Claiming mileage

As part of my degree I get to go off to several local hospitals to experiment practice on the patients. If the hospital isn't all that local you can get your accommodation reimbursed by the NHS bursary unit, if it is local you can claim train fare/petrol under the same scheme. I spotted that there was a 6.2 pence per mile allowance for cycling in the guidance notes so I thought I'd give it a go claiming mileage this year.

I've just got my expenses approved so I've pocketed just shy of £70 for cycling to and from placement, which as I'm sure the more gifted reading this will realise is over 1000 miles. My class mates aren't sure what's more strange, that I've cycled over a thousand miles or that I've claimed, and been paid, for it.
Just think of all the money I've saved the National Health Service with them not having to pay train fare instead.

Does anyone else here get mileage for cycling and do the honourable members think that this would be one way to encourage people to ditch their cars (although not literally, I've been in a car that's gone in a ditch and it's not pleasant) and cycle to work?
 

MGBLemonrider

Active Member
Location
Stevenage, Herts
As a casual user, if required to use my own vehicle, my options are public transport and claim back, use my car and claim whats called Public Transport Rate and parking, when I last did that (must be approaching 10 years) was something like 28p a mile, at that time essential users was 44p (what IR would allow and not see as a benefit) there were significantly lower rates for motorcycles and again banded as per size and a pittance if by cycle.
Hardly conducive to take anything other than your car.

But on the other hand it's only suposed to cover your running cost and not give you a profit.
 

stowie

Guru
On your tax return I believe you should be able to claim the difference in your work mileage rate and the inland revenue rate . So you might at least get some tax relief on the difference - although this is clearly not going to be the same as if your work gave you 20p per mile. Of course, the money able to be claimed back may not be worth the aggravation of a tax return!
 
Location
Essex
hackbike 666 said:
Good god how much could I claim for twenty+ years of commuting to Waterloo?:biggrin:
Nothing as it is your normal place of work. If you transfered from somewhere nearer to home, you could have claimed for a year.
 

Bayerd

Über Member
stowie said:
On your tax return I believe you should be able to claim the difference in your work mileage rate and the inland revenue rate . So you might at least get some tax relief on the difference - although this is clearly not going to be the same as if your work gave you 20p per mile. Of course, the money able to be claimed back may not be worth the aggravation of a tax return!
This is correct, apparently it's to compensate for the extra 'fuel' needed.

OP, if you also have a car you could always claim car milage and cycle instead.........
 

PBancroft

Senior Member
Location
Winchester
There's something quite satisfying about claiming mileage for cycling to another office. I've done it a few times when I've needed to go out, but sadly my external visits usually involve round trips of 100 miles + so cycling isn't always doable.

I do sometimes wonder why the payment is so much lower than for other forms of transport. I know that the point isn't to make a profit but if the company/organisation can afford the payment for driving, what's the real difference in paying a similar amount for cycling? Let's say set the rate at 50% of the reimbursement for driving.

I reckon more people would be encouraged to cycle, which would mean lower costs for the company and a healthier workforce. Not to mention more bikes on the road, which can only be a good thing. Win win! :biggrin:
 

summerdays

Cycling in the sun
Location
Bristol
I get paid when I have to various different locations, and we get 40p per mile (yes I know the bit above 20p is taxable). It was set at that rate as it was the same as the car rate at that time, and they wanted to encourage cycling - the car rate went up a little a year or two ago but only by a penny or two. Certainly at our office there are very few car parking spaces - and most of those are actually work vehicles - the bike racks are reasonably full over winter - and completely full in summer.

I hate filling out the forms though so I'm usually a month or two behind on them.
 
User3143 said:
Tight arses - the revenue say 20p a mile.
This seems to be the NHS standard rate, certainly it's what employed members of staff on one of my sites get if they claim for a call out. Although if I were called out in the night for an emergency patient I don't think I'd be cycling.

It would have been nice to get something more akin to £200 rather than £70 but as a student I'm grateful for anything I can get!


mr_cellophane said:
Nothing as it is your normal place of work. If you transfered from somewhere nearer to home, you could have claimed for a year.
Using this idea would it be possible to encourage people out of their cars by paying them mileage for their normal commute for a year? Once they see the benefits maybe they won't notice the money going away.
 
mr_cellophane said:
Nothing as it is your normal place of work. If you transfered from somewhere nearer to home, you could have claimed for a year.
Well technically on the very early morning turns or very late night turns im entitled to a taxi* although I have never used one to get me to work.

*=under old BR conditions.(Still apply)

So car drivers are entitled to petrol but im entitled to bug all?

I know car drivers at work claim for petrol allowance under same sort of conditions.

So mr c....if I don't really understand your sentence....I seem a bit thick today could you simplify? I read it time and time again but can't process.
 
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