Commuting - Which "waterproof's"

jamin100

Veteran
Location
Birmingham
So it's been a long while since ive commuted to work by bike, but a change of circumstances means i now have to at least cycle to the train station (2 miles) if not all the way into work (10 miles)

For the days im cycling into work, i'll probably use my usual cycle kit, but for the tain station days, its only a measly 2 miles so it doesnt seem worth it. However, in this rubbish wet weather im going to need some waterproof over trousers that I can wear trousers underneath and a hi viz of some kind (hes i know hi viz is useless for some drivers but at least I can say i tried)

So, are there any good bust cheap commuter wear knocking around? Decathlon/aldi maybe ?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
 
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How hard are you working when you ride?

If saving is your priority, wear what you already have and just change at your destination.

If you want effective waterproofs and the intention is to stay dry underneath your waterproofs, you'll need to avoid cheap clothing's boil in bag properties. You'll have to moderate effort, but also, you need to get spendy. Look for highly breathable man made materials like Gore-tex, especially if you are riding as far as 10 miles. Less breathable materials and exertion will leave you sweaty underneath, so you might as well do without.
 
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byegad

Legendary Member
Location
NE England
A Good old fashioned cycle Cape and front mudguard complete with a skirt guard, usually used on the back but adapted to fit the front, will be more than adequate for 2 miles.
 
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fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
The Aldi waterproof pants have been fine - a two mile pootle then they'd be good over normal trousers - not seen any this Winter, but may be Decathlon. Depends upon how dry you need to be (e.g. Smart pants).
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Consider Rainlegs to keep your thighs mostly dry and accepting that the lower legs of the trousers can just dry out afterwards.

Or a cape. I like capes. Depends how exposed to winds your ride is, though, so I don't think it's an all-weathers solution.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
For two miles, why not just walk to the station with an umbrella and some waterproof shoes? Saves the worry of leaving a bike locked at a station all day too. Weight bearing exercise is also important especially as we get older. You'll get more meaningful exercise walking 4 miles than cycling 4 miles. You could even run to the station if you're one of those runner oddballs :smile:

Do the 10 miles by bike on dry days
 
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jamin100

jamin100

Veteran
Location
Birmingham
How hard are you working when you ride?

If saving is your priority, wear what you already have and just change at your destination.
not very hard, its all downhill on the way to the station and then station the other end is walking distance to the office. On the way back, its up hill but i wont care on the way home as much.

For two miles, why not just walk to the station with an umbrella and some waterproof shoes? Saves the worry of leaving a bike locked at a station all day too. Weight bearing exercise is also important especially as we get older. You'll get more meaningful exercise walking 4 miles than cycling 4 miles. You could even run to the station if you're one of those runner oddballs :smile:

Do the 10 miles by bike on dry days
Because then I wouldnt get to ride my bike :laugh::wacko:
I'll also be taking my bike on the train to leave it at work. I'll be catching the early 6:40am train into Birmingham so it shouldnt be too busy. On the way back its 3pm so its not busy then either.

On the nicer days, i will of course ride home.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Fair enough. I wouldn’t bother with the hassle of a full size bike for a 2 mile ride and a train journey. Indeed not permitted at those times around London
 

cosmicbike

Perhaps This One.....
Moderator
Location
Egham
I've been using a pair of Decathlon waterproof trousers for the past 3 years. They're getting a bit worn now, but have given excellent service insome frankly awful weather. Like all waterproofs, they don't breathe too well, and need a topping up every year with Nikwax Techwash or similar.
 
My commute used to be that (2miles) and I wore Montane Featherlite over trousers every day. They're not 100% waterproof but they were breathable and kept the trousers clean and the commute was too short for a proper drenching to have any effect. 3 miles probably would be too much them in heavy rain although I extended my commute up to 30miles and they were breathable for that.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
My commute used to be that (2miles) and I wore Montane Featherlite over trousers every day. They're not 100% waterproof but they were breathable and kept the trousers clean and the commute was too short for a proper drenching to have any effect. 3 miles probably would be too much them in heavy rain although I extended my commute up to 30miles and they were breathable for that.
I tried the featherlites but they won't keep your trousers dry in cold rain. The Montane Atomic waterproof pants work quite well and have a good cut for cycling.

I like Paramo for winter riding, wet or dry. They seem to have a perverse design department with odd colours and shapes and stupid features like pockets zippers inside vents zippers.
 

Tom B

Über Member
Location
Lancashire
I just wear tights and get wet then change at work. I have several waterproof coats ranging from £10 to £120 all make me sweaty and water inevitably gets in.

The beauty of tights is they'll dry in no time at work.

I have an alpkit Goudon roll-top bag that's 4 years old and really good and dry. Perfect for carrying clothes.


I also keep all my work clothes at work and only bring them home for washing when im passing in the car. I've built up about 6/8weeks supply of work clothing. Work have been accommodating in allowing me storage.

If you do go for waterproof trousers size as tight as you can and get cycle cut legs.
 
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