Converting a road bike to a hybrid

Norfolk nik

New Member
This is my first post so please be patient. I have three road bikes but am looking to convert my winter hack Scott speedster to a flat bar commuter. Currently Shimano triple gearset.
How difficult would this be and any suggestions.
 

netman

Über Member
Assuming your Scott is 10sp... some flat bar changers like this and some brake levers (check compatibility with your brakes and gearing) and a flat bar with some grips of your choice... pretty easy if you've changed cables etc. before...
 
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12boy

Über Member
Location
Casper WY USA
You may want to change your tires to a larger size depending on what you have on there now and your frame and forks will permit. Schwalbe Marathons are preferred by many due to their puncture resistant qualities. A more upright seating position is good for commuting as it is easier to see ahead and that may lead you to a wider saddle than is good for a tucked in position on the drops. Some way to carry a load other than a backpack will keep your back less sweaty, and if the load will be lightish a rack that clamps on to the seatpost is a possibility. USB chargeable lights are good for travelling in poor light, both so you can see but also to be seen. Pedals that allow for street shoes are also useful. You can make these changes overtime, although tires and lights may be a priority. People who live in hilly areas will probably need gears, but if your ride is fairly flat a one speed is a possibility. When I commuted I had a Surly Steamroller with a rack, removable rear fender, forward lights with 400 lumens, a rear red blinkie, and two sets of wheels, one with Schwalbe Marathons and the other with studded snows, both 35 mm. That was so if roads were snowy or icy I could change quickly. I also had 2 way SPDs, so in cold weather hiking boots were an option. Since my headset, wheels and bottom bracket were are sealed cartridge bearing, my maintenance was usually just new tires, chains and brake pads. This may sound like TMI, but I thought an illustration of a commuting set up might be useful.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
You might find it too small going drops to flats so would need to play about with stems, seatpost layback, saddle position and what not (I did the same with a PX roadbike, never could get it right though even with another 3 cm of stem so sold to a friend a good 3 inches shorter than me)
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
Flats in the existing stem would be very short, equiv to riding on the tops. You may want a longer stem.
MTB flats are very flat. I changed mine to One One Mary for a more neutral hand position.
 

Grant Fondo

Riding backwards into the future
Location
Cheshire
This is my first post so please be patient. I have three road bikes but am looking to convert my winter hack Scott speedster to a flat bar commuter. Currently Shimano triple gearset.
How difficult would this be and any suggestions.
I found it fairly straightforward converting wifes specialized road bike, although no clearance for wider tyres (mainly due to being rim brakes?). So bit of a compromise i think in the end, ok though if drops are a no no.
 

Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
Pretty straightforward. I've only done it the other way around. Shifters and brake levers plus new cables. You'll need to experiment with stems maybe but start off with what you've got and see how you get on.
Don't go too wide with the bars if you're using it in a city.
Good luck.
 

DCBassman

Veteran
Location
Holodeck 2
This is my first post so please be patient. I have three road bikes but am looking to convert my winter hack Scott speedster to a flat bar commuter. Currently Shimano triple gearset.
How difficult would this be and any suggestions.
My Scott AFD Expert is flat barred. This was 3x8, will soon be 3x9. No idea how easy it might be to get 10-speed E Z Fires, but separate shifters and brake levers almost certainly an option. If yours is 9-speed, then Shimano ST-EF65-9 shifters are what you need, try and get four-finger versions if possible.
 
Location
London
Type of bike which originated in the 90s. Meant that if you weren't into mountain biking but hated drops there was a bike for you. Hybrids got me into cycling and i still ride builds of them today, including for touring. They also paved the way for fast straight bar city bikes.
Bow before the hybrid.
 
OP
Norfolk nik

Norfolk nik

New Member
You may want to change your tires to a larger size depending on what you have on there now and your frame and forks will permit. Schwalbe Marathons are preferred by many due to their puncture resistant qualities. A more upright seating position is good for commuting as it is easier to see ahead and that may lead you to a wider saddle than is good for a tucked in position on the drops. Some way to carry a load other than a backpack will keep your back less sweaty, and if the load will be lightish a rack that clamps on to the seatpost is a possibility. USB chargeable lights are good for travelling in poor light, both so you can see but also to be seen. Pedals that allow for street shoes are also useful. You can make these changes overtime, although tires and lights may be a priority. People who live in hilly areas will probably need gears, but if your ride is fairly flat a one speed is a possibility. When I commuted I had a Surly Steamroller with a rack, removable rear fender, forward lights with 400 lumens, a rear red blinkie, and two sets of wheels, one with Schwalbe Marathons and the other with studded snows, both 35 mm. That was so if roads were snowy or icy I could change quickly. I also had 2 way SPDs, so in cold weather hiking boots were an option. Since my headset, wheels and bottom bracket were are sealed cartridge bearing, my maintenance was usually just new tires, chains and brake pads. This may sound like TMI, but I thought an illustration of a commuting set up might be useful.
Thanks for the sound advice.
 
Type of bike which originated in the 90s. Meant that if you weren't into mountain biking but hated drops there was a bike for you. Hybrids got me into cycling and i still ride builds of them today, including for touring. They also paved the way for fast straight bar city bikes.
Bow before the hybrid.
But what *is* a 'hybrid'?
 
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