Crankset Removal Tips

So my 5(?) year old £20 eBay chainset is finally being replaced. Non-driveside crank came off fine, but the drives side just will not budge.
the threads are made of cheese, and I might have gone in a little hard. I've tried the hitting it with things, and I've also tried the riding it with the bolt slightly loose, but neither to any avail. Does anyone have anything else that might do the job? It's just a standard square taper crankset/bb.

I feel like this is going to be a saw it off job when I can next get into a workshop, but that might not be for a while at the minute.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Are you using a crank removal tool?
 

Slioch

Guru
Location
York
Can I assume you're using one of these gizmos - a crank extractor tool?

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Oops. Sharky beat me to it
 
Heat?
Hammer Time,!
Put crank arm in vice. Lever off

I think there is some bikeshop tool that pushed instead of pulls, that might just be a crowbar.
 

Slioch

Guru
Location
York
I stripped the thread in an old crankset doing the same. Eventually resorted to laying the bike on it's side supported around the bottom bracket area with blocks of wood, and bashing it with a large mallet. Pretty much destroyed the chainring in the process of getting it off.

I would not recommend this method for a decent bike.
 
Brass drift through the frame above the BB.
 
Heat?
Hammer Time,!
Put crank arm in vice. Lever off

I think there is some bikeshop tool that pushed instead of pulls, that might just be a crowbar.

Yeah I've heard rumours of this! And have also seen ones which retap the thread (only for very expensive cranks though, so they're rare).

Heat is the only thing I haven't tried yet. I live in a house share of all males so unfortunately no hairdryer between us. Has anyone got an alternative heat method?

I also don't have a vice until I can get back to work, and only have limited tools. Will heating do enough without a vice or is it just going to be futile?

I stripped the thread in an old crankset doing the same. Eventually resorted to laying the bike on it's side supported around the bottom bracket area with blocks of wood, and bashing it with a large mallet. Pretty much destroyed the chainring in the process of getting it off.

I would not recommend this method for a decent bike.

Hahah, not sure that the neighbours would appreciate this method down a small terraced street.

Based on what everyone is saying, I don't think I'm going to be getting this of at home, and I'll hacksaw it off when I'm back at work (and just replace the BB).
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Select a crowbar/large screwdriver or other lever. Lay the bike right side up and pour a full kettle of boiling water slowly over (target the stripped thread 'hole'), and then lever for Britain (or a chosen home nation). Aluminium expands at twice the 'rate' of steel.
 
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Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
The guy in my local bike shop here had never seen a crank extractor tool until I gave him one. Put a wood or metal bar behind the crank near the axle and give it a heavy blow with a lump hammer, works every time.
 

Gunk

Guru
Location
Oxford
The guy in my local bike shop here had never seen a crank extractor tool until I gave him one. Put a wood or metal bar behind the crank near the axle and give it a heavy blow with a lump hammer, works every time.

That’s how I’ve recently been able to remove one with damaging the chainset, two hard taps on the spindle with a hammer and drift and off it popped.

By accident I found that a bath tap spanner makes the perfect tool when clamped in a vice. It’s also ideal for removing seized cups.

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