Crowd lifts bus off trapped unicyclist

Ganymede

Veteran
Location
Rural Kent
Already mentioned in my thread in 'Cyclist Down' quoting a story which started with the death of the woman cyclist mentioned in your article.

I have thought about trying a unicycle and had heard that people use them to commute, but this is the first incident I've heard of. Great that all those people helped.
 

ManiaMuse

Veteran
I've only seen one unicyclist on the road before and that was on the A4 in London of all places.

Don't think they look particularly safe to ride on roads though? It's basically a very wobbly fixed gear bike with only one wheel, no brakes and no steering wheel right? Even skateboards/longboards and rollerblades are probably safer on the roads.
 

Ganymede

Veteran
Location
Rural Kent
There are rather wonderful-looking electric unicycles in existence - they work in a similar way to a Segway - but then it's not really a bike, it's just something you ride on.
 

adds21

Rider of bikes
Location
North Somerset
I've only seen one unicyclist on the road before and that was on the A4 in London of all places.

Don't think they look particularly safe to ride on roads though? It's basically a very wobbly fixed gear bike with only one wheel, no brakes and no steering wheel right? Even skateboards/longboards and rollerblades are probably safer on the roads.
I'm not sure there's any reason why an experienced unicyclist would be more unsafe on the road than a 2 wheeled cyclist, with the possible exception of speed (depending on your view, as being discussed in a different thread), and any confusion other vehicles may have simply by seeing a unicycle.

Someone riding a unicycle on the road is probably using a 29" or 36" wheel, which gives them a good extra "head" of height/visibility. Once you've mastered riding on one wheel, the number of wheels is pretty much irrelevant. In fact, I am much, much more manoeuvrable on a unicycle than I am on a bike.

Brakes-wise, as unicycles are fixed geared, you brake with your legs, so it's not correct to stay they don't have brakes, they do, and they're very effective. In addition, disk (and rim) brakes are not uncommon on road and mountain unicycles... Although they're usually used to "flatten out the downhills" rather than for stopping.

I hope the rider recovers quickly and completely.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
And then there's extreme mountain unicycling....

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUZuyMVdVcc
Stephanie Dietze and Lutz Eichholz unicycling down a 3011m high mountain in the Dolomites
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
. Although they're usually used to "flatten out the downhills" rather than for stopping.
.
I spoke to a unicyclist at 10 mile organised ride.

He had a mountain bike tyre on a 26" wheel and told me his only difficulty was keeping control on steep descents.
 
Top Bottom