Cycling the Vallée de la Maurienne up to Col de l'Iseran

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
I'll be riding up this amazing valley next month some time, in the 2nd half of my upcoming cycling trip to Les Alpes françaises. I really want to ride up to Col de l'Iseran, not just because the scenery will be very nice, but also because it's 6m higher than the previous highest pass I've ever cycled up, which was Passo dello Stelvio in the Italian Alps the year before last.

I was wondering if any of you have ridden up this valley, and if so then how did you find it? I know it's a long trip, so I'll probably be skipping the B&B breakfast ( :cry: ) on this day so I can leave extra early.

Regards,

--- Victor.
 
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Globalti

Legendary Member
Attention aux vaches!
 

slow scot

Über Member
Location
Aberdeen
I'll be riding up this amazing valley next month some time, in the 2nd half of my upcoming cycling trip to Les Alpes françaises. I really want to ride up to Col de l'Iseran, not just because the scenery will be very nice, but also because it's 6m higher than the previous highest pass I've ever cycled up, which was Passo dello Stelvio in the Italian Alps the year before last.

I was wondering if any of you have ridden up this valley, and if so then how did you find it? I know it's a long trip, so I'll probably be skipping the B&B breakfast ( :cry: ) on this day so I can leave extra early.

Regards,

--- Victor.
Where are you starting from? That'll make a big difference as starting from St Jean de Maurienne makes it a pretty long drag. Starting from Modane or beyond makes it a nicer ride, but to the top of the Iseran even from there still is a good day. At least once at the top it's downhill to Val d'Isere!
 
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Shut Up Legs

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
Where are you starting from? That'll make a big difference as starting from St Jean de Maurienne makes it a pretty long drag. Starting from Modane or beyond makes it a nicer ride, but to the top of the Iseran even from there still is a good day. At least once at the top it's downhill to Val d'Isere!
I'll be riding up the entire valley, then back down the same way, so yes it will be a long ride.
 
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Shut Up Legs

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
You might need that breakfast, before you set off.
Yes, but I'll have to leave extra early, because it's about 190km return trip. I've started long rides on no breakfast before: the key with these is to eat and drink enough during the ride.

I also just discovered on one of the col opening dates web sites that Col du Galibier has just opened (in the last day or 2), so my first planned ride (on June 18th) is to ride up there, via the southern approach. La neige m'attend.

The sooner I leave this crap country, the better. Several times over the last few days I've been harassed by motorists while just walking between home and my local shopping centre. The attitude of motorists in Australia to pedestrians and cyclists is appalling. They have an overinflated sense of entitlement, and any incident where a car hits a cyclist or pedestrian is just regarded as an "accident", and everyone pities its effect on the poor driver. Media articles routinely report any such incidents as between a car and a pedestrian/cyclist, almost as if the car has a mind of its own. Victim-blaming is rife in these articles, too: if the cyclist is wearing dark clothing, they "couldn't be seen", but if their lights are bright, then "their lights blinded me, Your Honour". I bloody hate this country, and it will be good to escape it for a little while.
 
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Shut Up Legs

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
and it can be bloody cold at the top

View attachment 470491
Yes, even though I'll be riding it sometime next month (my Alps cycling is from 18th June to 19th July), I'll bring cold-weather clothing with me on the ride. When I rode up Col du Galibier on 27th June 2017, it was about 10 degrees at the top (a relatively warm day up there), and that's over 100m lower than Col de l'Iseran.
 
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