Cyclists win undisclosed damages.

Bazzer

Setting the controls for the heart of the sun.
I hate tram tracks. There are a couple of places on my commute where I have to cross them at less than ideal angles and have come off once when my wheel got caught. To make 90 degrees to cross them requires some swerving and I dread a following car considering my swerve is a more permanent indication of travel.
 
OP
Slick

Slick

Guru
A girl lost her life on those tracks last year which in my opinion, Edinburgh city council's stance of it was all the cyclists fault in this case even more disgusting. Nice to see at least one judge get it right.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Those tram tracks are awful and a real hazard for cyclists. I remember getting stuck in one in Sheffield not so long ago. It wrenched my arm and it was sore for days.
 
OP
Slick

Slick

Guru
They can be made safer by filling the slot with rubber but it seems operators prefer injuring cyclists to spending money.
Hence the judgement with quite a few more to come on the back of it. I assume Edinburgh city council won't be the only organisation looking at cyclist safety now.
 
I frequently hear that tram lines are dangerous for cyclists and I see the theory, but Stuttgart has a dual gauge tram system, so sometimes there's metre gauge and standard gauge lines, i.e. three grooves in the road instead of two, and I've never had the slightest problem. I even have to regularly cross the terminus of a metre gauge line where there's metre gauge track and standard gauge track inset into the surface and going in all directions,

I'm wondering if the track is different here: I certainly haven't ever seen rubber inserts or cyclists falling over because of the tramlines.

Don't misunderstand me, I'm not unsympathetic, just curious that we don't seem to have the problem despite having a far more comprehensive tram network than most UK cities.
 
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Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
Fro my experience riding in Edinburgh and Berlin fairly comprehensively is that in Edinburgh the road and cycle lane layout has you crossing the tracks at a much shallower angle and more frequently than in Berlin. Edinburgh seems in places to meander either side of a track meaning you are more likely to have opportunity to get a wheel caught. It could also be that apart from the hipsters most German bikes seem to run a wider tyre.

Having said that the only place I have seen people fall off on tram tracks is Berlin ;)
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Environmentally less damaging transport is great, just so long as it doesn't pose a risk of serious injury or death to users of other means of even less damaging means of transport. The compo is well deserved.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Milton Keynes was originally designed to accommodate a tram system. That's why the central reservations are so wide on the original grid roads, as that's where they were going to run. For those that know the area, the terminus was scheduled to be at CMK under the elevated road opposite Burger King.

Alas, the money was never forthcoming. Nevertheless, whoever designed the place had some nouse as the redways would never have to cross tram tracks, and there was always a bridge or underpass at these crossover points. It would have been fantastic if it had come off as originally envisaged.
 

flake99please

We all scream for ice cream
Location
Edinburgh
There were a few areas where the crossover points for cyclists were at angles which were unsafe imho. The route around the Haymarket area was particularly ill thought out and was revised/improved after the accident there.

I still think the crossover point on Princes Street, where the trams take a left turn to go into St. Andrews square is dangerous. Riders cannot ‘take the lane’ if wishing to go straight ahead without the risk of finding yourself in the tracks.
 
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