Do you know what I mean

ayceejay

Guru
Location
Rural Quebec
I am guilty of saying d'ya know what I mean from time to time and it is quite common for people to say similar in conversation but I met a guy yesterday who said what sounded like "nahmeyun" and I found it odd and interesting as he said it in virtually every sentence, like a verbal tick. And then I went to see a bloke today with that fresh in my mind and he said "and that" at the end of every sentence except he said "ahnat". Now I am on the look out for similar ticks - have you experienced anything like this?
 

Archie_tect

De Skieven Architek... aka Penfold
Location
Northumberland
'sort of' and 'like'....
 

toeknee

Über Member
Location
Wirral
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.........calm down ..calm down ..calm down.
Know what I mean like lad...
 

Lullabelle

Banana
Location
Midlands UK
I know 2 people who emphasise the word 'literally' at the beginning of their sentence.
 

Alex H

Guru
Location
Alnwick
I worked with someone, for nearly 4 years, who managed to fit "turned round" into nearly every sentence he spoke :wacko:

Despite us drawing attention to it many times, he couldn't / wouldn't stop.
 

Moon bunny

Wha' d'yer mean, "veteran"?
Discourse markers. They have many uses, fillers while the speaker thinks what to say next, to emphasise what is being said, or soften the effect, to question if the listener understands and need the speaker say more, (at this point in informal speech I could well say "know what I mean?"). They are a fascinating subject and say a lot about the speaker and how they see their place in society. For instance when I was interviewing certain people for a social history project, the interviewee would use completely different markers after he found out that I was a graduate, indicating, perhaps, that although intelligent he saw himself as not as educated as he might have been, which would give me a clue to ask questions about how the troubles had affected his school life.
 
Location
Loch side.
Discourse markers. They have many uses, fillers while the speaker thinks what to say next, to emphasise what is being said, or soften the effect, to question if the listener understands and need the speaker say more, (at this point in informal speech I could well say "know what I mean?"). They are a fascinating subject and say a lot about the speaker and how they see their place in society. For instance when I was interviewing certain people for a social history project, the say interviewee would use completely different markers after he found out that I was a graduate, indicating, perhaps, that although intelligent he saw himself as not as educated as he might have been, which would give me a clue to ask questions about how the troubles had affected his school life.
I'm never going to speak to you, if you know what I mean. You see right through people, if you get my drift.
 
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