Fell off

gazza81

Über Member
Location
Edenbridge
If anyones been following my other threads, im very new to the sport just picked up my first road bike.

Today first time riding it it felt like i had no grip at all on the rear wheel, every now and then i could feel i little slip.

Coming round a corner and the back wheel went, bit of a bruised wrist but ok.
There was another rider at the side of the road that had done the same thing.

My bikes fitted with these...20190223_113629.jpg
They say max inflate 85psi which is what they are, would i benefit from maybe going 75psi?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Yes, don't go up to the top of the range, which is...? How heavy are you?

This is a used bike, in what condition are the tyres? Maybe consider some new ones, although it's warm for Feb, the roads are greasy still and of course gravelly/potholey. That said Randonneurs aren't racy tyres, more for touring, and they're on the chunkier side for a roadbike at 28mm
 

13 rider

Guru
Location
leicester
If another rider was down there was probably something in the road diesel etc . It will take time to build confidence just take it steady for now . Hopefully your heal quickly .I wouldn't rush to change anything maybe drop the pressure a fraction just build your your riding experience
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
You say the same thing had happened to another rider, so my guess something on the surface of the road caused your fall and not the tyres.

I've had rear slippage when braking hard or on a slippery man hole cover or when out of the saddle climbing a steep hill, but usually fairly easy to bring under control. Front wheel slippage, though can be lethal especially when combined with black ice.
 

the snail

Veteran
Location
Chippenham
If they're brand new tyres then there may be some mould release agent left on the tyres, so best to take it easy till the tyres have worn in a bit.
 
OP
gazza81

gazza81

Über Member
Location
Edenbridge
The whole ride the rear wheel felt slippery, the tyres look good condition too.
I will try dropping the pressure a little, im 180lbs

I dont think it was anything particular in the road as like i say the whole ride felt slippery.

I noticed the other guy had very thick tyres on poss 38c
 
OP
gazza81

gazza81

Über Member
Location
Edenbridge
Yes, don't go up to the top of the range, which is...? How heavy are you?

This is a used bike, in what condition are the tyres? Maybe consider some new ones, although it's warm for Feb, the roads are greasy still and of course gravelly/potholey. That said Randonneurs aren't racy tyres, more for touring, and they're on the chunkier side for a roadbike at 28mm
It dosnt say a range just max inflate 85psi or 6 bar
 
OP
gazza81

gazza81

Über Member
Location
Edenbridge
Ive got a feeling the previous owner came off too and some damage to the right hood, now the left ones damaged too haha
 

vickster

Legendary Member
It dosnt say a range just max inflate 85psi or 6 bar
Odd there's usually a range
 
OP
gazza81

gazza81

Über Member
Location
Edenbridge
Hope you heal quickly, probably diesel or grit as someone has already said.

There a two types of cyclists, those who have fallen off their bikes and those who haven’t fallen off yet.
Luckily not hurt at all really little bruise on my wrist, could have been alot worse.
I said exactly that to the guy at the side of the road, at least i got it out the way now!
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
My bikes fitted with these...View attachment 454113
They say max inflate 85psi which is what they are, would i benefit from maybe going 75psi?
Don't just set pressures randomly. There's a very useful tyre pressure graph out there on the internet, the result of considerable testing, which gives the optimum pressure according to the tyre width and the imposed loading on each wheel. Flat bar bikes are normally assumed to have a 40/60 front/rear weight distribution, drop bars more like 45/55. The correct pressures are worked out from the weight per wheel of the proportion of the rider's weight, plus half the weight of the bike itself.
 
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