Frame rear widening - Yes it has just been painted !!!!!

Hi to all of you Cycleologists. Has anyone had the experience of needing a steel frame (Columbus Tubing) widening,but after it has been painted - indeed it has been stove enamelled. The frame is currently set for a 125mm axle and I am looking to increase it to accommodate a 130mm axle.
The frame has horizontal drop-out and whilst I can spring a 130mm axle into the frame,it is detrimental to the painted finish on the drop-outs.
My reasoning behind opening it out is to be able to accommodate an 8,9 or 10spd cassette.
 

jim55

Veteran
Location
glasgow
Hi to all of you Cycleologists. Has anyone had the experience of needing a steel frame (Columbus Tubing) widening,but after it has been painted - indeed it has been stove enamelled. The frame is currently set for a 125mm axle and I am looking to increase it to accommodate a 130mm axle.
The frame has horizontal drop-out and whilst I can spring a 130mm axle into the frame,it is detrimental to the painted finish on the drop-outs.
My reasoning behind opening it out is to be able to accommodate an 8,9 or 10spd cassette.
Should b ok using the right tool ( threaded rod washers and nuts) it's only 5 mm but obv ul have to go a wee bit further to allow for it springing back ,and do both sides equally , it's ready to push out too far and it won't b aligned right , it's easy but also easy to make a cock of
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I know we've just had a thread about a cracked chain stay brace, but widening is usually easy enough.

Ebikers do it regularly to accommodate motor kits.

A mate of mine who builds ebikes for a hobby uses wooden blocks and a wedge.

A bike frame is actually very resilient, so you are unlikely to break it.

What is harder to predict is impact on the paint finish, although I've never heard my mate mention any problems.
 

Bodhbh

Guru
I know we've just had a thread about a cracked chain stay brace, but widening is usually easy enough...

What is harder to predict is impact on the paint finish, although I've never heard my mate mention any problems.
That would be me. I did get a couple of small patches where the paint came off - a bit less than a square cm each side. I had to spread the dropouts 15-20mm, and on a folder with short stays. I'd assume spreading 5mm on a full sized bike is much less of a risk.
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
I would think the Horizontal drop out are the big concern, would they not need bending back after you spread the frame.
Yes, you should realign the dropouts after spreading the triangle. There are tools for the job. You can use a couple of bolts of appropriate size - 10mm and long enough so that, bolted one to each dropout facing inwards, they nearly touch. Then you can see when they are parallel and in line.
 

arch684

Veteran
I did this just a few weeks ago to an old steel frame.I used a threaded bar 2 nuts and 2 washers.Put the bar into the drop outs with the nuts and washers in the inside then using a spanner just force them apart but it takes time and you need to be careful , you could use rubber washers to protect the paint
 

jim55

Veteran
Location
glasgow
Yes, you should realign the dropouts after spreading the triangle. There are tools for the job. You can use a couple of bolts of appropriate size - 10mm and long enough so that, bolted one to each dropout facing inwards, they nearly touch. Then you can see when they are parallel and in line.
Large shifting spanner bends dropouts back quite easily
 

screenman

Legendary Member
Keep the paint warm as this will make it more flexible, it is something the I do when working on cars doing PDR when it is cooler. I would use a hanger alignment tools after you have done with the bending.
 
Hi to all that have responded to my query. Just after I posted about my concerns I went into the Sheldon Brown website and saw what looks like a considerably more brutal way of spreading the rear stays than what has been described her on CycleChat.
I am actually seriously considering going and paying a visit to B&Q and get some 10mm stud-iron,nuts and washers including some fibre washers as paint protection.

Hi fossyant. Your post arrived whilst I was bashing the keyboard. Is the frame builder/maker local to you or is it my territory?
 
Hi roadrash. Thank you,yes I know Steve,he is only a mile from where I used to live in Tawd Bridge,UpHolland,currently he is a 12mile drive away.
He is not always at the premises and seems to disregard listening to messages when left or even checking his phone.. I called in there on the 'off chance' at the back-end of the summer with one of his frames that needed a few bits of cosmetic tidying and a dérailleur braze-on removing. That frame has been treated to a new jacket - a fabulous Flamboyant Blue. It was done by C&G Finishes,Liverpool,they did my Benotto which was recently listed on the forum under :- My latest acquisition - an as-yet unknown 52cm (20.5")model - Benotto.
The Steve Goff frame is also the subject of another post under the heading of :- Not strictly a 'Special Interest' piece, BUT!!!!!
Interestingly enough. I have just recently picked up the Steve Goff frame and will hopefully be riding it in the late Spring or early Summer.

I will post some images of it in due course. Although I have had the frame and forks refinished I do have brand new pair of Chromed forks for it as-well albeit the crown race shoulder needs a slither off of it. Possibly a job for Steve at the same time as refitting the Campagnolo Chorus Headset Cups into the frame.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
I remember a mate of mine spreading the rear triangle, trouble was only one side moved. The bike did ride a bit odd afterwards.
 
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